• A fall day on Mt. Rose overlooking the historic depot at Grand Portage.

    Grand Portage

    National Monument Minnesota

Personal Adornment

GRPO 14712 Jesuit ring

Jesuit Ring - GRPO 14712

NPS photo / Douglas Birk

  • Overview
    • Just like today, people of the fur trade era had a wide variety of tastes, fashions, and cultural beliefs which were expressed through personal adornment. Adornment such as rings, brooches, pendants, armbands, or intricate beadwork could help express the wearer's status, religious beliefs, or just be a colorful expression of individuality.
    • During the eighteenth century, Great Lakes peoples increasingly chose their adornment from European trade goods, such as multihued glass beads, plain or glass inset trade rings, bright red vermillion, ostrich feathers, and of course, beautiful Montreal silverwork. This wasn't a matter of Native peoples adopting European fashions: fur trade goods were carefully tailored to Native tastes, and Native people also adapted non-decorative European items -- such as metal salvaged from firearms and brass trade kettles -- into attractive items of adornment.
    • European voyageurs themselves adopted many Native customs including fashionable beadwork, trade silver, and brass tinklers.
  • View Personal Adornment Two further description (44 Kb PDF)
 

 

Did You Know?

A Montreal canoe at Grand Portage National Monument

The 40 foot “Montreal” class of birchbark canoe used on the Great Lakes during the 18th century, could carry the weight of two mid-sized cars…that’s over four tons or about 8,000 pounds!