• A fall day on Mt. Rose overlooking the historic depot at Grand Portage.

    Grand Portage

    National Monument Minnesota

Archaeology

Archaeological excavations at Grand Portage National Monument have continued regularly since the site's rediscovery in 1922. Research papers are in chronological order.

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1. Woolworth, Alan R., Archaeological Excavations at the Northwest Company's Fur Trade Post, Grand Portage, Minnesota, In 1936-1937 by the Minnesota Historical Society 1964. (37,482 KB pdf)
2. Woolworth, Alan R., Archaeological Excavations at the Grand Portage National Monument 1962 Field Season, Museum Curator, Minnesota Historical Society, December, 1968. (13,848 KB pdf)
3. Woolworth, Alan R., Archaeological Excavations at Grand Portage National Monument: 1963-1964 Field Season, 1969. (31,024 KB pdf)
4. Woolworth, Alan R., Archaeological Excavations at the North West Company's Depot, Grand Portage, Minnesota in 1970-1971 by the Minnesota Historical Society, 1975. (47,141 KB pdf)
5. Woolworth, Alan R., An Historical Study of the Grand Portage, Grand Portage National Monument, Minnesota, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1993. (2, 685 KB pdf)
6. Clark, Caven, Ph.D., Late Prehistoric Cultural Affiliation Study, Grand Portage National Monument, Minnesota, Prepared by Archaeological Consulting Services, Ltd., Tempe, Arizona, November 9, 1999. (14,824 KB pdf)
7. Birk, Douglas A., Archaeologist/ Historian, Grand Portage National Monument Maintenance Area Preliminary Survey,February 2006. (542 KB pdf)
8. Hamilton, Scott, Graham, James, Norris, Dave, If These Walls Could Speak: Using GIS to Explore the Fort at Grand Portage National Monument, Department of Anthropology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, 2004.(23,340 KB pdf)
9. Cooper, David J., Of Sextants and Satellites: David Thompson and the Grand Portage GIS Study CRLS Colloquium, Kenora, Ontario, Canada, 2004. (1,677 KB pdf)

Did You Know?

The Gap

The Grand Portage corridor follows a gap in the hills created by more intense weathering through a fault weakened section of ridge.