• View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

    Grand Canyon

    National Park Arizona

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    Monsoonal weather patterns have moved into the Grand Canyon area decreasing fire danger. As a result, on Tuesday, July 8 at 8 a.m. fire managers lifted fire restrictions within Grand Canyon National Park. More »

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Rangers Respond to Fatality on Bright Angel Trail

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Date: November 10, 2009
Contact: Shannan Marcak, 928-638-7958

Grand Canyon, AZ. –At approximately 6:00 p.m. on Monday, November 9, the Grand Canyon Regional Communications Center (Grand Canyon’s 911 dispatch center) received a report of a man down on the Bright Angel Trail just below “mile-and-a-half house”.  The reporting party, family members who had hiked ahead of the man, said that when they found him he was not breathing, was unresponsive and his head was bleeding.

While rescue personnel were dispatched to the scene, the 911 operator provided family members with instructions on how to perform CPR (cardio-pulmonary resuscitation).  Upon arriving at the scene, park rescue personnel took over CPR, but were never able to revive the patient; and he was declared dead at the scene.

The man has been identified as 63 year old Joseph Mitchell of Clarkdale, Arizona.  His body was retrieved this morning by helicopter via long-line operation and transported to the South Rim helibase where it was transferred to the Coconino County Medical Examiner.

The National Park Service is conducting an investigation into the incident.

-NPS-

 
To download a copy of this news release in .pdf format, CLICK HERE.

Did You Know?

SPRINGS PROVIDE OASES FOR FLORA AND FAUNA

Within the Grand Canyon, the type and abundance of organisms is directly related to the presence or absence of water. The Colorado River and its tributaries, as well as springs, seeps, stock tanks and ephemeral pools provide oases to flora and fauna in this semi-arid southwest desert area.