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National Park Service Lifting North Kaibab Trail Closure in Grand Canyon National Park

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Date: June 2, 2012
Contact: Maureen Oltrogge, 928-638-7779

Grand Canyon, Ariz. - A trail closure is being lifted between Roaring Springs and Cottonwood Campground on the North Kaibab Trail in Grand Canyon National Park. A temporary route through the damaged section has been established, however it is very narrow and hazardous conditions exist so extreme caution should be used when hiking in that area.

The section of the North Kaibab Trail between Cottonwood Campground and Roaring Springs was closed on May 31 when a ruptured pipeline washed out a 45-foot section of the trail. As trail crews work on the trail and pipeline additional temporary closures will be necessary and delays could occur for hikers on this section of trail. These temporary short-term closures could occur with little or no advance notice.

Potable water will not be available at Roaring Springs or Cottonwood Campground until the pipeline is repaired. Hikers should be prepared to access and chemically treat or filter creek water.

For additional information about trail access, permit changes and water availability in the inner canyon, please contact one of the Backcountry Information Centers within Grand Canyon National Park at 928-638-7875 (South Rim) or 928-638-7868 (North Rim), or visit us on-line at go.nps.gov/grcabackcountry

Did You Know?

SPRINGS PROVIDE OASES FOR FLORA AND FAUNA

Within the Grand Canyon, the type and abundance of organisms is directly related to the presence or absence of water. The Colorado River and its tributaries, as well as springs, seeps, stock tanks and ephemeral pools provide oases to flora and fauna in this semi-arid southwest desert area.