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Grand Canyon National Park to Manage Three Fires on North Rim for Multiple Objectives

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Date: July 18, 2013
Contact: Kirby-Lynn Shedlowski, 928-638-7958
Contact: Vanya Pryputniewicz, 928-638-7628

Grand Canyon, AZ – On Sunday, July 14, the National Park Service found two small lightning-caused fires burning on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. On Monday, July 15, a third lightning-caused fire was detected.

Fuller Fire: The Fuller Fire is less than one-tenth of an acre in size and is burning in a single tree. It is located on Fuller Canyon road within the 2000 Outlet Fire burn area.

Meadow Fire: The Meadow Fire is one-half acre in size and is located west of Highway 67 and approximately 1.75 miles south of the North Rim Entrance Station.  It is burning in a mixed-conifer forest.

Hades Fire: The Hades Fire is two-tenths of an acre and is located north of the Basin, approximately one-half mile west of the Range Road.

After taking into consideration the fires' locations, the fuels they are burning in and current and predicted weather, the National Park Service has decided to manage all three fires for multiple objectives. Resource objectives include maintaining fire in a fire-adapted ecosystem and reduction of accumulated forest fuels. Protection objectives include protection of firefighter and visitor safety, sensitive cultural resources and critical wildlife habitat.

Northern Arizona remains in a monsoonal weather pattern at this time. While regular monsoonal rains continue, minimal growth is expected on these fires. If rains should decrease and a drying trend occur, growth on all the fires is possible and smoke may become visible from Highway 67 within the park, Fuller Canyon Road, Cape Royal Road, the North Rim developed area and South Rim viewpoints.

There are no fire-related road or trail closures on the North Rim at this time. Additional news releases about these fires will only be posted as significant changes in size, fire activity or management objectives occur.

For more information on Grand Canyon's Fire Management program, please visit us on the web at http://www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/firemanagement.htm

-NPS-

 

Did You Know?

GRAND CANYON ROCKS

The more recent Kaibab limestone caprock, on the rims of the Grand Canyon, formed 270 million years ago. In contrast, the oldest rocks within the Inner Gorge at the bottom of Grand Canyon date to 1.84 billion years ago. Geologists currently estimate the age of Earth at 4.5 billion years.