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Body of man recovered from below the South Rim of Grand Canyon identified

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Date: November 30, 2009
Contact: Maureen Oltrogge, 928-638-7779

Grand Canyon, Ariz. The body of a man that was recovered from below the South Rim of Grand Canyon on Saturday afternoon has been identified as that of 62 year-old, B. Holt Vaughn from Broomfield, Colorado.   Although it was originally reported that his body was located approximately 200 feet below the rim, new assessments by park rangers indicate he fell approximately 400 feet.

Shortly before 12:30 p.m., on Saturday, November 28, the Grand Canyon Regional Communications Center began receiving calls from park visitors regarding a man over the edge in an area between Mather Point and Pipe Creek Vista located approximately two miles east of the South Rim Village.  His body was located a short time later by park rangers who had initially responded by helicopter.  Park search and rescue rangers rappelled down to where the man’s body had been located and prepared the body for transport via helicopter to the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park.  His body was transferred to the Coconino County Medical Examiner, located in Flagstaff, Ariz., later that day.

An investigation is being conducted by the National Park Service.  Mr. Vaughn had been visiting the park with his son, daughter-in-law and other extended family when the incident occurred. 

-NPS-

 

 

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