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Park rangers recover body of hiker from Lava Falls Route

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Date: July 8, 2010
Contact: Maureen Oltrogge, 928-638-7779

Grand Canyon, Ariz. – Grand Canyon National Park rangers located the body of a female hiker today in an area below the North Rim of Grand Canyon near the Toroweap Valley. A man had called the Grand Canyon Regional Communications Center last night at approximately 8:20 to report an overdue hiker. The female hiker had gone to Tuweap on Tuesday with the caller’s son. The man indicated that his son was going to hike down Lava Falls Route to gain access to the Colorado River for a float trip. When the female failed to return home, the man became concerned and reported her overdue to the National Park Service.

Park rangers launched a search for the rafter this morning and located him on the river late in the morning. The young man indicated that he had last seen his hiking companion on Lava Falls Route at mid-day on Tuesday. Park rangers then began an aerial search of Lava Falls Route and located the body of a female at approximately 1:00 this afternoon. Her body will be flown to the Kingman Airport and transferred to the Mohave County Medical Examiner at the airport. 

The young woman’s name is being withheld pending positive identification by the Mohave County Medical Examiner and notification of next-of-kin.

-NPS-

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