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Lightning Causes Several Fire Starts on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park

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Date: June 14, 2010
Contact: Shannan Marcak, 928-638-7958
Contact: Maureen Oltrogge, 928-638-7779

Grand Canyon, Ariz. – A thunderstorm passed over Northern Arizona late last week resulting in three lightning caused fires on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. The fires were discovered between Friday (6/11) and Saturday (6/12). Two fires, the Walla Fire, approximately 12 miles northwest of the North Rim developed area and the Fuller Fire approximately six miles northeast of the North Rim developed area were both suppressed at a tenth of an acre because of potential threats.

The Glades Fire is approximately nine miles southeast of the North Rim developed area. The fire is currently estimated at 1/10th of an acre – the fire is burning primarily in ponderosa pine and is being managed for resource and protection objectives. It is located on the Walhalla Plateau one mile east of Cape Royal Road between Vista Encantada and Cape Final. This area previously burned in 1999 and 2005 reducing the potential for high severity fire due to the reduction of fuels.

Smoke from this wildfire fire may be visible from the North Rim developed area, as well as from Cape Royal Road. Smoke may also be visible from South Rim developed areas. Smoke is likely to settle into the canyon during the evening, but should lift out early in the morning due to daytime heating.

Four Grand Canyon firefighters are committed to the fire.

The National Park Service fire management program is grounded in general and park specific science. Fire and resource managers continue to learn and now have a better understanding of the role fire plays in the environment. Wildfire is an essential, natural process – some plants and animals depend on fire for survival. Periodic fire stimulates growth, reproduction of plants, and provides wildlife habitat. By managing the Glades wildfire for multiple objectives, fire managers will help protect the Cape Royal Road while allowing ecological benefits of wildfire across the landscape.

There are no fire-related road or trail closures on the North Rim at this time and all facilities on the North Rim are open.

Additional news releases about this fire will only be posted if significant changes in size, fire activity or management objectives occur.

Fore more on the fire management program at Grand Canyon National Park visit the park’s web site at http://www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/firemanagement.htm. For more on these fires, please contact Shannan Marcak, Public Affairs Specialist at 928-638-7958 or Maureen Oltrogge, Public Affairs Officer at 928-638-7779.

-NPS-

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