• View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

    Grand Canyon

    National Park Arizona

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Expect Isolated Showers and Thunderstorms Friday, with Increasing Chances Over the Weekend

    Monsoonal weather patterns have moved into the Grand Canyon area decreasing fire danger. As a result, on Tuesday, July 8 at 8 a.m. fire managers lifted fire restrictions within Grand Canyon National Park. More »

  • Two Bats Collected in the Park Have Tested Positive for Rabies

    One on the North Kaibab Trail and the other at Tusayan Ruin/Museum. Rabies can be prevented if appropriate medical care is given following an exposure. Any persons having physical contact with bats in Grand Canyon National Park, please follow this link. More »

Fire Ecology and Education

RX firefighter

Fire has been a part of the Colorado Plateau ecosystem for thousands of years. Its presence is important for wildlife habitat, nutrient recycling, plant diversity, and overall landscape health. Fire managers at Grand Canyon National Park seek to strike a balance between restoring and maintaining natural processes associated with fire, and protecting human life and property.

During the past century, fire was feared and suppressed. This led to a significant and unnatural buildup of live and dead trees, pine needles, shrubs, and grasses. Not only does this buildup create risks for developments near wildland areas, it poses a threat to the health of the forests.

Fire naturally thins the forest, recycles nutrients into the soil, and stimulates new plant growth. Fire ecology research has shown that many plant and animal species benefit from the rejuvenating effects of fire.

Fire managers use monitoring data and the latest fire ecology research to guide their efforts to restore the natural fire regimes at Grand Canyon National Park. Fire managers work with wildlife biologists, vegetation ecologists, historic preservation specialists, and interagency cooperators to achieve common goals of enhanced habitat and improved ecosystem functions.


 
 
air quality monitoring instrument

Fire Effects Monitoring - Air Quality
Grand Canyon Visibility - WEBCAM
Air Quality Standards

 
 
night_fire_monitoring_65x65

Fire Effects Monitoring - Vegetation & Fuels

2011 Fire Ecology Annual Report (1.02 MB PDF file)
Wildland and Prescribed Fire Monitoring and Research Plan (649 kb pdf file)

 

Did You Know?

NEVER APPROACH WILD ANIMALS

The elk found within Grand Canyon National Park weigh as much as 1,000 pounds (450 kg), and have been known to injure people who approach them. Never approach wild animals. It is dangerous, and illegal, to feed the wild animals in a national park. Violators will be fined.