• View of Grand Canyon National Park at sunset from the South Rim

    Grand Canyon

    National Park Arizona

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • For the Next Several Days, Expect Thunderstorms and Locally Heavy Rain

    Monsoonal weather patterns have moved into the Grand Canyon area decreasing fire danger. As a result, on Tuesday, July 8 at 8 a.m. fire managers lifted fire restrictions within Grand Canyon National Park. More »

  • Temporary North Rim Road Closures Due to Galahad Fire Began May 29

    As of Thursday May 29, two road closures are in effect for public and firefighter safety. W4 road is closed from FS268B road south to Pont Sublime. W1 road is closed from W4 to western end of the Basin. More »

Insects, Spiders, Centipedes, Millipedes

Riparian: The insect species commonly found in the river corridor and tributaries are midges, caddis flies, mayflies, stoneflies, black flies, mites, beetles, butterflies, moths, and fire ants. Numerous species of spiders and several species of scorpions including the bark scorpion and the giant hairy scorpion inhabit the riparian zone.

Desert Scrub and Coniferous Forest: Numerous insects and arachnids live in Grand Canyon National Park's desert scrub and coniferous forest habitats. Some of the common insects found at elevations above 2,000 feet are orange paper wasps, honey bees, black flies, tarantula hawks, stink bugs, beetles, black ants, and monarch and swallowtail butterflies. While scorpions are found mostly in the lower elevations, solpugids, wood spiders, garden spiders, black widow spiders and tarantulas can be found crawling around in the higher elevations.


 
ns_cicada

The Love Song of Summer (audiocast)

Everyone is trying to escape the heat. Everyone except for one love struck Romeo, singing loudly under the full punishing glare of the summer sun. From deep within the Canyon, echoes the love song of the Cicada.

 
Audiocast by Park Ranger Haley Bercot
Download the Transcript (32kb PDF File)
Download link (4.73MB MP3 File) cut and paste this link into your media player: http://www.nps.gov/grca/photosmultimedia/upload/20090330InGRCA_cicada.mp3
 

Did You Know?

A curious California condor

California condors, being curious, are attracted to human activity. If you see a condor, do not approach it or offer it food. As you enjoy your next Grand Canyon viewpoint, look for these massive scavengers soaring on their nine-foot (3m) wings over the canyon. More...