• Bristlecone Pine

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Wheeler Peak Summit Trail Closed

    A small smoldering fire near the trail has caused the closure of the Wheeler Peak Summit Trail. park staff is observing the fire. Check back here to get an update whne the trail will open. Alpine Lakes Loop and Bristlecone Trail are open. More »

  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    Road work will begin in Upper Lehman and Wheeler Peak Campgrounds. Campgrounds will be open but may be noisy and have large vehicles on the roads. The Scenic Drive is open with up to 15 min delays due to road work. Click more for details. Updated 9/9/14 More »

  • Travel Not Recommended - Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive Above 8,000 Feet

    Snow and ice may make travel on Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive unsafe, travel is not recommended at this time. Warmer weather over the weekend is expected and conditions may improve. 10/1/2014

  • Snake Creek Road and Campsites Closed

    The Snake Creek Road will be closed from the park boundary into the park to begin work on campsites, trails and restroom improvements. Work will continue until snow closes the project. Work will resume in Spring 2015.

Pets

Please be aware that having a pet with you will limit your activities in Great Basin National Park. Kennel services are not available in or around the park.

Be aware of the following regulations before deciding to bring your pet:

  • Pets must be kept on a leash 6 feet in length or shorter at all times. This is for the protection of the pet, wildlife, and other visitors.
  • Pets are not permitted in Lehman Caves or at evening programs.
  • Pets are not permitted on trails or in the backcountry of the park (except leashed pets on the Lexington Arch Trail and the Great Basin Visitor Center to Baker Trail).
  • Leashed pets can only be exercised in the campgrounds, in front of the visitor centers, and along roads.
  • Pet owners are required to immediately remove and properly dispose of fecal matter deposited by their pets. Deposit bags of fecal matter in a dumpster.
  • Pets may not be left unattended at campsites or tied to trees or other fixtures.

Why are there restrictions on pets in National Parks?
A national park is a refuge for native wildlife. Restrictions are intended to prevent stress and molestation of wildilfe, to protect pets from wildlife that may attack or harm them, and to provide an enjoyable experience for those visitors without pets. Domestic animals can also spread diseases to other wildlife through feces and other bodily fluids.

Did You Know?

Bristlecone Pine; photographed by Kathy Billings

Many of Great Basin National Park's bristlecone pines were growing at the time the Egyptians were building the pyramids. Not only are the trees themselves old, but the needles alone can be 25-40 yrs old!