• Bristlecone Pine

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

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  • Cave Tours Sold Out

    Cave Tours are sold out for Friday 10/17 and Saturday 10/18. You can make reservations for Sunday at (775) 234-7517. Please be patient call voulmnes are high, we will get back to you. Checkout the other great things to do at Great Basin National Park. More »

  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    The Scenic Drive is open with up to 15 min delays due to road work. Wheeler Peak Campground will be closed for the day on October 14th. Lower Lehman Campground will be closed for the day on October 15th. Click more for details. Updated 10/9/14 More »

  • Snake Creek Road and Campsites Closed

    The Snake Creek Road will be closed from the park boundary into the park to begin work on campsites, trails and restroom improvements. Work will continue until snow closes the project. Work will resume in Spring 2015.

Springs and Seeps

Although Great Basin National Park is located in the desert, the mountainous terrain rises and intersects passing storms to receive additional precipitation. This precipitation infiltrates the ground and then often emerges as springs and seeps. Those that flow only part of the year are called ephemeral, while those that flow year round are perennial.

The park conducted an inventory of perennial springs and seeps in 2003-04 and documented over 425. Baker Creek watershed alone contained almost 150 springs. Several areas of the park were completely dry due to the underlying karst geology which allows the surface water to percolate into the rock and flow to the aquifer. Nearly 90% of the springs had visible animal sign near them, showing how important water is to animals in the desert.

Some of the springs that are marked on topographical maps were not flowing during the inventory. One of the reasons may be that pinyon pine and juniper have encroached upon sagebrush areas and white fir has invaded aspen stands. These newcomers use more water than the original vegetation, so they may be taking all the available water. The park is planning to remove some of these trees to see if some of the water can be restored.

Gretchen M. Baker, April 2007

Did You Know?

Lexington Arch

Great Basin National Park is home to Lexington Arch, one of the largest limestone arches in the western United States. This six-story arch was created by the forces of weather working slowly over the span of centuries. This type of above ground limestone arch is rare.