• Bristlecone Pine

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Wheeler Peak Summit Trail Closed

    A small smoldering fire near the trail has caused the closure of the Wheeler Peak Summit Trail. park staff is observing the fire. Check back here to get an update whne the trail will open. Alpine Lakes Loop and Bristlecone Trail are open. More »

  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    Road work will begin in Upper Lehman and Wheeler Peak Campgrounds. Campgrounds will be open but may be noisy and have large vehicles on the roads. The Scenic Drive is open with up to 15 min delays due to road work. Click more for details. Updated 9/9/14 More »

  • Travel Not Recommended - Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive Above 8,000 Feet

    Snow and ice may make travel on Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive unsafe, travel is not recommended at this time. Warmer weather over the weekend is expected and conditions may improve. 10/1/2014

  • Snake Creek Road and Campsites Closed

    The Snake Creek Road will be closed from the park boundary into the park to begin work on campsites, trails and restroom improvements. Work will continue until snow closes the project. Work will resume in Spring 2015.

Nonnative Species

An invasive species is defined as a species that is:

  1. non-native, or alien, to the ecosystem and
  2. whose introduction causes or is likely to cause environmental or economic harm, or harm to human health.

Invasive species can be plants, animals or other organisms, such as microbes. Invasives are dangerous because they often arrive in environments better suited to them than the ecosystem they evolved in. They thrive because of different seasonal patterns, water patterns, or lack or competition or predation, and can outcompete native species. Pushing natives to extinction reduces overall biodiversity. Estimates suggest that over half of the threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act have been negatively impacted by invasives.

Human actions, whether accidental or intentional, are the primary cause of invasive species introductions.

Non-native Animals

Some of the invasive animal species that have been found in Great Basin National Park are the brown trout, brook trout, rainbow trout, Lahontan cutthroat trout, house mouse, wild horse, House sparrow, European starling, and wild turkey.

Non-native Plants
There are over 25 species of non-native plants in Great Basin National Park, including cheatgrass, spotted knapweed, crested wheatgrass, bull thistle, and musk thistle. Not all species are equally harmful to the ecosystem, so only those that pose the greatest threats are targeted for control. Control measures usually involve pulling or spraying plants.

Plants are introduced via many routes. Some are planted in gardens or during roadside stabilization projects. Others are introduced accidentally as contaminants in seed, animal feed, or even packing material! Nonnative seeds and plant parts are often spread by being carried on the hooves or hides of animals, in the doors or undercarriages of vehicles, or on hikers' apparel. The fact that some plants are continuously being re-introduced into the park poses additional problems.

You can help control non-native plants in the park by scrutinizing your shoes, socks, and pants legs for "hitchiking" seeds.

Did You Know?

Western skink

Skinks and many other lizards have the ability to rejuvenate their tails. The bright coloration of the tail in some species attracts predators to the break-away appendage, aiding in escape.