• View of the Golden Gate Bridge, taken from the Marin Headlands, looking towards San Francisco at sunrise.

    Golden Gate

    National Recreation Area California

Golden Gate Climate Update

 
Climate update logo showing Golden Gate Bridge, clouds and NPS arrowhead

Join Golden Gate Climate Update as we hear from people helping your National Parks understand and adapt to climate change. This podcast series interviews leading scientific authorities, park staff and partners involved with climate change science, response and sustainability as it relates to National Parks; particularly those in the West.

You can listen to the two-part podcasts listed below individually or you can subscribe to the series through the RSS feed above.




You can also check out these Golden Gate podcasts on the Earth to Sky web site:

Climate Change, Upwelling, and California's Coastal Seabirds

Climate Change and Sudden Oak Death


 
Photo of Dr. James Johnstone

Changes in Wind, Upwelling and Fog

Dr. James Johnstone is a researcher at the University of Washington’s Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean. Jim studies the relationship between wind, upwelling, and fog along the West Coast. In this interview, he discusses long-term declines in coastal fog and how this may relate to changes in wind and upwelling associated with climate change.

Interview date: 7-10-10

Part 1 - mp3 audio (5:12 min., 1.9 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (5:35 min., 2.0 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Dr. Patrick Barnard

Climate Change and Coastal Processes

Dr. Patrick Barnard is a research geologist with United States Geological Survey coastal and marine geology program. Patrick studies coastal erosion and processes along the California coast. In this interview he discusses how climate change factors may affect erosion rates.

Interview date: 7-07-10

Part 1 - mp3 audio (4:49 min., 1.7 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (3:58 min., 1.4 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Dr. Anthony Westerling

Climate and Wildfires in the West

Dr. Anthony Westerling
is a Professor of Engineering, Natural Sciences, and Geography at the University of California, Merced. One topic of his research focuses on climate and wildfires. In this interview he discusses how he uses models to predict what fire could look like in the next season or in climate change scenarios a hundred years from now.

Interview date: 7-06-10

Part 1 - mp3 audio (4:30 min., 1.6 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (5:03 min., 1.8 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Daryl Hannah putting biofuel in her vehicle.

Biofuels and Sustainability

Actress Daryl Hanna is a prominent environmentalist, sustainability advocate, and promoter of biodiesel fuels. In this interview she talks about the benefits of biofuels and other environmental projects with which she is involved.

Interview date: 10-14-09

Part 1 - mp3 audio (4:11 min., 1.5 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (5:48 min., 2.1 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Michael Reichmuth

Marin County Salmon and Climate Change

Michael Reichmuth
is a fisheries biologist with the National Park Service, San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network. One of his main areas of focus is researching salmon in Marin County.In this podcast, Michael discusses the declining population of Coho salmon and the potential threat climate change poses for the species.

Interview date: 7-29-09

Part 1 - mp3 audio (4:53 min., 1.7 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (5:07 min., 1.8 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Dr. David Ackerly

Plant Distribution Changes

Dr. David Ackerly
is a professor of integrative biology at UC Berkeley who studies climate change and botanical response in California. In this podcast, Dr. Ackerly will be discussing the effects of climate change on plant distributions.

Interview date: 9-02-09

Part 1 - mp3 audio (4:57 min., 2.3 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (5:10 min., 2.4 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Dr. Noah Knowles

Sea Level Rise and San Francisco Bay

Dr. Noah Knowles is a Research Hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. One area of his research is climate change and how it may affect the San Francisco Bay ecosystems. In this interview, Noah will tell us a about his research and the implications it has for the future of San Francisco Bay.

Interview date: 11-03-09

Part 1 - mp3 audio (6:04 min., 2.8 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (3:57 min., 1.8 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Marcus Koenen

Monitoring for Climate Change

Marcus Koenen, Program Manager for the National Park Service, San Francisco Bay Area Network Inventory and Monitoring Program tells us about the Inventory and Monitoring Network and how it can be used to detect the effects of climate change in the Bay Area parks.

Interview date: 7-16-09

Part 1 - mp3 audio (5:07 min., 2.4 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (4:54 min., 2.3 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photo of Emily Limm

Redwood Forest Drying

Dr. Emily Limm is a postdoctoral student at U.C. Santa Cruz. Dr. Limm studies how the ferns, shrubs, and trees of the redwood forest absorb fog and how this vital water source maintains the health of the redwood forest. In this interview she discusses how climate change may affect California's coastal redwood forests.

Interview date: 11-03-2009

Part 1 - mp3 audio (5:38 min., 3.9 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (4:22 min., 3 mb), pdf text transcript


 
Photograph of Robert Cahalan

Climate Observations and Models

Dr. Robert Cahalan, head of NASA’s Climate and Radiation Branch based at Goddard Space Flight Center. His group studies climate on the scale of years to millions of years. In this interview Dr. Cahalan discusses climate change and how it may affect national parks.

Interview date: 8-13-2009

Part 1 - mp3 audio (4 min., 2.8 mb), pdf text transcript

Part 2 - mp3 audio (6 min., 4 mb), pdf text transcript


Did You Know?

Franklin Street at Fort Mason

By the 1850s, Fort Mason was established as a military installation and the buildings on Franklin Street, constructed between 1864 and 1913, are some of the earliest remaining buildings at Fort Mason.