• View of the Golden Gate Bridge, taken from the Marin Headlands, looking towards San Francisco at sunrise.

    Golden Gate

    National Recreation Area California

Fire and Fuels Planning

Each national park with burnable vegetation must have a fire management plan (FMP) before implementing any prescribed burns or large-scale fuel reduction projects. GGNRA completed a two-year NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) public planning process in March 2006. A Final Environmental Impact Statement, published in October 2005 described in detail the National Park Service's preferred strategy for fire management in GGNRA and the potential adverse and beneficial impacts that could be expected as that strategy is implemented. The NEPA process was completed in February 2006 with the signing of a Record of Decision (120 KB PDF) by the Regional Director. An Operational Strategy for the Fire Management Plan was completed in April 2008. The following GGNRA Fire Management Plan is now being implemented:

2005 Golden Gate National Recreation Area Fire Management Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement

Golden Gate National Recreation Area Operational Strategy for the Fire Management Plan - April 2008

Under an agreement between GGNRA and Point Reyes National Seashore, the Northern Lands of GGNRA, including Bolinas Ridge and Olema Valley, are managed by Point Reyes National Seashore. Fire management planning for the 15,400 acres of the GGNRA Northern Lands are addressed in the PRNS Fire Management Plan and were assessed for potential environmental impact in the following EIS:

2004 Final Fire Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement for Point Reyes National Seashore and North District of Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Fire and fuels planning is done by establishing fire management units (FMU's) which describe objectives for different areas within each park. Planning in fire and fuels management is essential to ensure that all fire suppression and fuels treatment actions strongly support resource management and community protection objectives. The planning process also minimizes adverse impacts to park resources and neighboring communities.

Fire and fuels management planning at Golden Gate National Recreation Area is guided by Reference Manual 18 - Wildland Fire and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and the park's Fire Management Plan. Director's Order 12 and the Reference Manual for DO 12 guide the NPS in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Golden Gate National Recreation Area is part of National Fire Planning Unit #5 (FPU #5). This FPU includes several land management units in Northern California. For more information, visit the Fire Program Analysis website.

Did You Know?

Basalt pillows

Geologists sometimes call Franciscan pillow basalt “greenstone” because it contains green minerals formed in an interaction between the basalt and hot, mineral-rich seawater.