• View of the Golden Gate Bridge, taken from the Marin Headlands, looking towards San Francisco at sunrise.

    Golden Gate

    National Recreation Area California

Education Vision

Goals

Enhance student learning through proven educational practices

Golden Gate programs will employ a student-centered curriculum that builds on student knowledge; support it with in-depth inquiry-based learning; and, teach and reinforce it with instructional opportunities that celebrate the unique background and experience each student brings to the park. Programs will take advantage of new and emerging education technology that improves student achievement.

Motivate students to become informed and active

Students will engage in an issue-oriented urban education curriculum designed to help them understand and address major environmental issues. Programs will encourage critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Connect Golden Gate and the community

Education programs will be a collaborative effort that brings the community to the park, and the park to the community. Golden Gate programs will tie the curriculum to the home culture of the students, and will present multiple points of view and diverse perspectives. Programs will link park restoration or research projects with similar community projects.

Build future constituencies through curriculum-based education programs

Educators and students will understand the philosophies, practices and strategies used by the National Park Service in the protection and preservation of the nation's natural and cultural heritage. Students will be introduced to careers in environmental advocacy, in general, and the National Park Service, in particular.

Principles

Inclusive definition of environmental education

In creating education programs for Golden Gate, park staff, teachers and students will define the environment broadly, to encompass natural ecosystems and the social-cultural systems in the local community. In this context, students will make connections between history, politics and natural resources in their region. They recognize the relevance of their decisions to their community and their environment. They learn about the significance of national parks within a context that is personally meaningful.

Equitable education

Golden Gate will cultivate educational environments that encourage all students to learn to the best of their potential. The park will make programs accessible to students for whom English is a second language through the use of translated curriculum guides, bilingual volunteers and multiple styles of learning. The park will establish and sustain relationships with schools that serve low-income students.

Education as a two-way process

Learning about the natural and cultural world takes place in the context of social relationships. Education programs must involve the interaction of students with park staff, teachers and other students, not simply the actions of park staff and teachers on students. Students experience cooperative learning, see the curriculum applied in the real world, and have a moment to reflect on their own contributions.

Did You Know?

Artist's conception of the Portola expedition's first sighting of the San Francisco Bay from Sweeney Ridge in 1769.

Sweeney Ridge holds the site where the Spanish became the first Europeans to discover the San Francisco bay.