• Sunset view of Glacier Bay and the surrounding Fairweather Mountains.

    Glacier Bay

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Mountaineering information form



Please fill out the following information and return to Glacier Bay National Park and preserve.

EXPEDITION NAME:

EXPECTED YEAR OF CLIMB:

DEPARTURE DATE:

RETURN DATE:

MOUNTAIN:

ROUTE:

LEADER/ORGANIZER:

Name and address for all members of the party.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

PLANNED DROP-OFF POINT:

PILOT’S NAME AND COMPANY:

RADIO TYPE (IF APPLICABLE) CHANNEL OR FREQUENCY:

TENT TYPES AND COLOR:

DAYS OF FOOD FUEL:

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER/NAME:

The coastal mountains in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, topped by the 15,300-foot Mt. Fairweather, are among the least visited mountains of their elevation in North America. Mountaineering is made especially challenging by a stormy weather pattern and over 100 inches of precipitation a year; parties frequently spend one to two weeks waiting out storms. The remote access, harsh conditions, and limited availability of rescue require that a climbing party be experienced and totally self-reliant.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

PLANNED ROUTE:

ALTERNATE ROUTE:

COMMENTS:

Please notify the Yakutat Ranger Station at (907) 784-3295 or Park Headquarters in Bartlett Cove at (907) 697-2230 when you have completed your trip. We would appreciate your mailing us a report of your climb to add to the limited information available on the Fairweather Range.

Did You Know?

Lamplugh Glacier wall of blue ice

When Captain George Vancouver surveyed Southeast Alaska in 1794, the wall of ice that filled the bay was (at its greatest extent) 100 miles long, 20 miles wide, and 4,000 feet thick. Just 250 years later, this same ice has retreated 65 miles, the fastest glacial retreat on record.