• Sunset view of Glacier Bay and the surrounding Fairweather Mountains.

    Glacier Bay

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

New Superintendent Named at Glacier Bay NP

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: September 8, 2010
Contact: John Quinley, 907-644-3512

A career scientist and public land manager, Susan L. Boudreau has been named as superintendent of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. 

Boudreau will take the helm of Glacier Bay effective next month. The Southeast Alaska park has a diverse range of ecosystems supporting marine and terrestrial wildlife, with opportunities for exploration and research. The park also recognizes and perpetuates values associated with the Tlingit homeland, wilderness, and solitude.

"Susan knows Glacier Bay and the neighboring communities well from her time there as the chief of natural and cultural resources, and she's proven to be an effective leader in Skagway," said NPS Alaska Regional Director Sue Masica.

"It is a tremendous privilege to be selected as the Superintendent for Glacier Bay and I'm looking forward to being back in the community of Gustavus," Boudreau said.

Boudreau's federal career spans more than 24 years, including time as a district ecologist, forest ecologist, ecological monitoring program manager, and, since September 2007, as superintendent of Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Skagway. Klondike Gold Rush NHP provides an integral link in a ribbon of sites that connects more than 950,000 visitors to the places, events, and resources of the Gold Rush of 1898, extending across the international border to Dawson and beyond.  

Boudreau has lived in Alaska for 14 years. She has a B.S. in Forest Management and a M.S. in Ecosystem Ecology from Oregon State University. Her hobbies are cooking, hiking, skiing, kayaking and playing guitar.

She replaces Superintendent Cherry Payne, who retired earlier this month. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve covers more than 3.2 million acres and was established in 1918

Did You Know?

Pacific Spiny Lumpsucker

The Pacific Spiny Lumpsucker is a favorite discovery for divers in Southeast Alaska. They are poor swimmers, spending much of their time attached to the bottom by a sucker evolved from pelvic fins.