• Winter light on the Fairweather Range

    Glacier Bay

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Curriculum Materials

Bring Glacier Bay to your classroom. Study otters, bears, underwater sound, halibut, the marine environment, crabs, seabirds, kelp forests, and more...

  • A pod of killer whales in Glacier Bay

    Featured Materials

    Acoustics 1: The World of Underwater Sound

    The ocean is filled with amazing noises. Learn how marine mammals rely on sound to survive. Explore »

  • bear in the grass

    Featured Materials

    Bears of Glacier Bay 1: Name That Bear

    Can YOU identify Glacier Bay's different bears? Explore »

  • harbor seal in Glacier Bay

    Featured Materials

    Seals of Glacier Bay 1: Flipper Feet

    Seal? Sea lion? Learn how to tell the difference in this fun lesson. Explore »

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  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Acoustics 3: On The Trail of a Whale

    Acoustics 3: On The Trail of a Whale

    Students will learn that humpback whales make different vocalizations. They will discover how scientists can use technology to track whales by listening to their vocalizations. Students will engage in a role play activity that simulates the tracking of whales using hydrophones as they migrate between Alaska and Hawaii.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Seals of Glacier Bay 1: Flipper Feet

    Seals of Glacier Bay 1: Flipper Feet

    Students begin this investigation by watching the seven-minute video, Harbor Seals in Glacier Bay. Jamie Womble, a seal researcher at Glacier Bay, interacts with local students to answer questions about harbor seals and various ways to study them. Students compare their answers to the researcher questions and their reactions to the video. As researchers, students observe the similarities and differences between seals and sea lions and create a Venn Diagram to graph these features.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Bears of Glacier Bay 3: Be Bear Aware

    Bears of Glacier Bay 3: Be Bear Aware

    Students will become “bear aware” by exploring ways to reduce human-bear interactions and applying them to different real-life scenarios. They will use critical thinking skills to make a list of considerations when camping, hiking, fishing, and at home. Students will conclude by creating a “Bear Aware Campaign” by making posters, creating podcasts or videos, or writing news stories.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Bears of Glacier Bay 1: Name That Bear

    Bears of Glacier Bay 1: Name That Bear

    Students begin this investigation by watching the nine minute video, Bears of Glacier Bay. Tania Lewis, a researcher at Glacier Bay, interacts with local students to answer questions about the two bear species found in Glacier Bay. Students discuss their reactions to the video and then become researchers in a role play activity. As researchers, the students collect data to compare similarities and differences between people and bears at various stages of maturity.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Acoustics 2: Echolocation in Action

    Acoustics 2: Echolocation in Action

    Students will engage in a listening game that simulates how killer whales use echolocation to find food in Glacier Bay. They will try to determine the location of nine sounds made from various locations around a circle – in front, behind, or to the side of them. The data collectors will record the results and the class will analyze the data. In the final round, students will be introduced to ambient noise to see how it affects the ability of the killer whales to locate their prey.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Acoustics 1: The World of Underwater Sound

    Acoustics 1: The World of Underwater Sound

    Students begin this investigation by watching the seven-minute video, "Underwater Acoustic Monitoring." Students discuss their reactions to the video and then listen to sound clips of ocean animals and human-made sounds. This will familiarize them with sounds commonly heard in the ocean. This investigation demonstrates how humans and marine mammals rely on sound for communication and even survival.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Bears of Glacier Bay 2: The Scoop on Poop

    Bears of Glacier Bay 2: The Scoop on Poop

    This investigation will introduce students to the importance of using good observation skills, which enables researchers to accurately collect and record data. Students will be given a sample of (teacher-created) bear poop to analyze. The scientific word for poop is scat. Through careful observation and examination, they will be able to answer questions about what bears eat, quality of habitat, time of year, and bear safety.

  • Cape Hatteras National Seashore

    Tooth or No Tooth? How to Eat Like a Whale

    Tooth or No Tooth? How to Eat Like a Whale

    This lesson is designed to teach students how to identify whales as marine mammals. The teacher will introduce the difference between baleen and toothed whales and increase the students understanding of the feeding method of baleen whales, and why Baleen whales are connected to Cape Hatteras National Seashore

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    The Kelp Forest

    The Kelp Forest

    Kelp forests promote marine biodiversity. In the absence of predators such as the sea otter, kelp forests can be decimated by grazers such as sea urchins. With the return of the sea otter to Glacier Bay, the kelp forests have returned. A wide variety of living creatures could not survive in the urchin barrens but thrive in the kelp forests.

  • Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve

    Sea Otters in Glacier Bay

    Sea Otters in Glacier Bay

    Sea otters, once nearly eliminated by hunters, have made a spectacular comeback. Until recently, otters had not found their way into Glacier Bay. Now that has changed - presenting the National Park Service with a unique opportunity to understand more about the effect of the otters' return on the ecosystem.

Did You Know?

Sitka Spruce

Sitka Spruce is the third largest coniferous tree in the world. One tree even grew to 328 feet!