• Sunset view of Glacier Bay and the surrounding Fairweather Mountains.

    Glacier Bay

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Loading the Skull and Mandibles

September 26, 2012 Posted by: K. VandenBerg

Monday, September 24

Morning

Dan is back!  He arrived this morning with Snow's "chariot" (the U-Haul truck) from Juneau.  The 8 ft. x 20 ft. vehicle will transport the entire skeleton from  Glacier Bay to Maine this Thursday.  The goal for this afternoon is to get the fragile skull and mandibles loaded in the truck.  Once the largest pieces of the skeleton are loaded, Dan will build a wooden box, or framework, around the skull to support it while in transit.  The sturdy framework will also serve as shelving for most of the vertebrae.

Afternoon

What an event! This afternoon Dan and park staff moved the skull from storage to the truck. Snow's skull had been resting on a boat trailer under a temporary shelter for years. Careful planning had to be done. Snow's skull was very fragile and broken in many places. It had also been weakened by sun damage. Dan and park staff took great care to secure the skull to the pallet before moving. This helped to prevent possible shifting during the short transport from the shed to the maintenance yard. Finally, after everyone was satisfied, the skull was ready to be loaded. With care and precision, the forklift  lifted the skull right into position. Success!

The enormous  mandibles came next.  They had being stored on the floor of the bone cache for many years.  Any time you entered the cache, you were always one step away from these huge bones!  It took a crew of 5 strong people to move and lift them into the truck. Success!

Dan will continue to work into the evening inventorying and packing bones.  We will continue to post updates during this process.

It took some equipment and lots of teamwork to get the skull and mandilbes loaded into the truck.

 

 

 

 

 


Post A Comment

Submit Comment

Did You Know?

Western Hemlock

Downed logs in advanced stages of decay provide the ideal habitat for Western Hemlock seedlings to take root.