• Mt Reynolds

    Glacier

    National Park Montana

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Logan Pass water system temporarily down

    The water system will shut down Tuesday afternoon, July 22, and the temp system is anticipated to be working by the weekend. Visitors should bring water or refillable water bottles. There will be some water available to refill bottles in the parking lot. More »

East Side Sewer Project to Begin September 18

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: September 15, 2006
Contact: Melissa Wilson, 406 888-7895

WEST GLACIER, MONT. – Officials at Glacier National Park report that VECI, Inc., from Missoula, Mont., will begin construction on a portion of the sewer force main that runs along the Going-to-the-Sun Road from Rising Sun to the St. Mary Campground on September 18, 2006. The project is expected to be completed by the end of October.

This portion of the road will remain open to vehicular traffic during the construction project. However, visitors may experience short delays, as there will be a temporary single lane closure adjacent to the work site. Visitors should use caution and drive slowly through the construction zone.

The construction work entails burying 1,000 gallon concrete tanks at nine low spots along this stretch of the road. These tanks will act as collection points for draining the force main each fall. Park crews will pump these tanks and deliver the wastewater to the St. Mary Wastewater Treatment Plant. This is the same operation done on the west side of the park each fall from Apgar to Lake McDonald Lodge.

Additionally, visitors are reminded that also beginning September 18, a short 2.5 mile segment of the Going-to-the-Sun Road will be closed to visitor traffic between Siyeh Bend and Logan Pass for accelerated road rehabilitation. Visitors will be able to travel approximately 15 miles from St. Mary to Siyeh Bend. Further, Logan Pass will still be accessible from the west side.

Did You Know?

Lake McDonald

Lake McDonald is the largest lake in the park with a length of 10 miles and a depth of 472 feet. The glacier that carved the Lake McDonald valley is estimated to have been around 2,200 feet thick.