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Public Invited to Presentation Regarding Airborne Contaminants in Glacier National Park

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Date: October 3, 2007
Contact: Melissa Wilson, 406 888-7895

WEST GLACIER, MONT. – Officials at Glacier National Park invite the public to a presentation by Dixon H. Landers, Senior Research Environmental Scientist from the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, entitled “Glacier National Park: Airborne Contaminants, Sources, and Risk to Park Ecosystems.” The presentation will be held on Tuesday, October 9, 2007, at 7 p.m. in rooms 144A and 144B of the Arts and Technology Building at the Flathead Valley Community College, in Kalispell, Mont. 

Dr. Landers will focus on the results for Glacier National Park from the preliminary Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) report. Of note, analyses for Glacier indicate that the park receives considerable industrial and agricultural-related airborne contaminants, even in some of the park’s most remote locations. For certain contaminants, wildlife exposure thresholds are exceeded for several different species that feed on fish.

WACAP was initiated in 2002 by the National Park Service to determine if airborne contaminants were having an impact on remote western ecosystems. Field crews collected data from snow, water, sediment, fish, and terrestrial vegetation from 2003 to 2005 in watersheds from eight national parks, including Glacier National Park.

- NPS -

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