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Thanking America’s Armed Forces

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Date: May 16, 2012
Contact: Denise Germann, 406-888-5838

WEST GLACIER, MONT. - Glacier National Park, as well as the other 397 sites of the National Park Service, will offer a free annual pass to active duty military members and their dependents. The passes will be available beginning on Armed Forces Day, Saturday, May 19. The annual pass will allow free entrance to national parks and other federal recreation sites.

Active duty members of the U.S. Military and their dependents can obtain their pass at Glacier National Park's headquarters building or any park entrance station. They must show a current, valid military identification card to obtain their pass. More information is available at www.nps.gov/findapark/passes.htm.

This military version of the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass also permits free entrance to sites managed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S. Forest Service.

The active military pass is not available to veterans and retirees, but there are other passes available. US citizens 62 years of age and older may purchase a lifetime pass for $10, and citizens with a permanent disability may obtain a free lifetime pass. An annual Glacier National Park pass for unlimited access to the park for one year from time of purchase of the pass is available for $35. An annual pass available for $80 allows free entrance to federally operated recreation sites across the county.

National parks and the military have strong ties going back to the establishment of Yellowstone as the world's first national park in 1872. The U.S. Cavalry watched over America's national parks and did double duty, serving as the first park rangers until the National Park Service was created 44 years later. During World War II, many parks were set aside for the training and care of military personnel. Today, dozens of national parks commemorate military battles and achievements. The new military pass, and any of the annual passes, may be obtained from a staffed park entrance station, or from the park headquarters building. For more information about the passes please contact Glacier National Park at 406-888-7800.

Did You Know?

Centennial logo

Did you know that the Glacier Centennial Program had a calendar of over 100 activities for its 100th anniversary? Over 35 community organizations worked together to make this possible.