• Visitors hike along the base of the Gila Cliff Dwellings.

    Gila Cliff Dwellings

    National Monument New Mexico

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  • Thunderstorm Safety Closures Possible

    When thunderstorms are nearby, the trail to and from the Gila Cliff Dwellings is closed. Please check local forecasts before you visit. Thunderstorms are typically more likely in the afternoon. On some afternoons it is not possible to reopen. More »

  • Fire Restrictions on Gila National Forest

    Gila National Forest currently has fire restrictions in place. Smoking and fires are never permitted on Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument property. More »

  • Guided Tours Currently Not Available on Many Days

    Due to a current shortage of volunteer staffing, guided tours of the cliff dwellings are offered only infrequently. Self-guided tours remain available from 9 am to 4 pm MDT daily.

Fish

A photo of Gila Trout on display at the Contact Station.

Gila Trout mockup on display at the Contact Station.

NPS Photo by Barry Nielsen

Most notable of the species of fish is the endangered Gila trout, which is being forced out by the imported Brown trout and Rainbow trout. Endangered species of fish in the Gila National Forest are the Gila trout, Chihuahua chub, Beautiful Shiner, and Gila Topminnow. The Loach minnow and spikedace are listed as threatened. Species listed as sensitive are the Rio Grande Cutthroat trout, Roundtail chub, and Rio Grande sucker. The following species are listed in the brochure "Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles and Mammals...A Species Checklist for the Gila National Forest," which can be obtained by calling the Gila Cliff Dwellings Visitor Center at (575) 536-9461 or by clicking on the link below.

Unless otherwise noted, the abundance of a species may range from uncommon to fairly common to common.
Gila trout - rare
Rio Grande cutthroat trout - rare
Rainbow trout, Cutthroat trout, Brown Trout, Chihuahua chub - rare
Roundtail chub Spikedace - rare
Loach minnow - rare
Speckled dace, Longfin dace, Fathead minnow, Red shiner, Beautiful shiner - extirpated
Carp Desert sucker, Rio Grande sucker, Sonora sucker, Channel catfish, Black bullhead, Yellow bullhead, Flathead catfish, Gila topminnow - extirpated
Mosquitofish, Smallmouth bass, Largemouth bass, Bluegill, Green sunfish, Longear sunfish, White crappie

 

Did You Know?

Geronimo Plaque

Geronimo said, “I was born at the headwaters of the Gila River.” The Gila area in New Mexico is the traditional homeland of the Eastern Bands of Chiricahua Apache and remains important to their oral traditions, history and cultural identity.