header image: nps.govUS Department of InteriorNational Park ServiceNational Park Service
Visitors hiking in a park.
FAQs

How do I brainstorm ideas for projects or activities in which to participate?

1) Is there something in particular you would like to learn?

2) Is there a particular project on the park’s website that interests you?

3) Are you more interested in exploring an educational program or being engaged in a volunteer service project, or perhaps both?

4) How many Scouts plan to take part in the project?

5) What is the timeframe for completing the project? Do you want to complete it in one day or work several weekends?

6) Do you plan to earn the certificate or work towards the patch?

7) Is there anything you don’t want to do?

What information does the park need from me?

1) Age range of participating Scouts

2) Timeframe for completing the project(s)

3) Interests and ideas for activities (use your brainstorm list)

What if I cannot reach the park’s representative?

This person is commonly the volunteer coordinator, a park interpreter, or the youth programs coordinator, so it is suggested you ask for these individuals. If you need further assistance contacting the park, contact the NPS Regional Youth Programs Coordinator in your state. See list below

Can this program contribute toward earning the Eagle Award?

The Scout Ranger program is not a part of the qualifications for the Eagle Award; however experiences Scouts gain from participating in the Scout Ranger program may contribute toward progress in earning the award. Click on the Eagle Award will take you to the BSUSA site for more information on the requirements to receive Eagle Award

Do I have to conduct projects at multiple park sites, or can I participate at just one park?

You can do whatever combination of hours and park units you would like.

Can I participate in the program more than once?

Yes. You can of course spend more than five or ten hours participating in an educational program or working on a volunteer service project. However, only one certificate and/or patch will be awarded to a Scout. The NPS is confident you will have so much fun through the experience that you will come back to the park or seek out another park whether you earn an award or not.

Why five hours for a certificate and ten hours for a patch?

It is important for Scouts to spend some quality time exploring park resources. Five hours is an afternoon at a national park site and ten hours is two afternoons, or a month of volunteering 2 or 3 hours per weekend. The NPS strongly believes that with these set hour requirements, Scouts will come away with not just a certificate or patch, but the reward of discovery and hopefully an interest in something new.

How did this program come about?

The Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger program is a collaboration between the BSA and the NPS under the umbrella Good Turn for America initiative. The nation and the world are increasingly turning to technology which some believe leads to a decrease in children participating in outdoor activities. Youth who participate in outdoor activities that help them expand their horizons will develop new ideas, new perspectives, and an increased appreciation for natural and cultural resource stewardship. The Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger program supports the NPS goal of introducing youth to the outdoors. Beyond that, it is a great opportunity for today’s youth to join together, have fun, and make a difference!

Why should I be engaged in this program?

The Scout Ranger program is exciting and fun! You can have fun in the outdoors and at the same time discover something new about yourself and your surroundings. There are many different types of career opportunities with the National Park Service like biology, firefighting, education and interpretation that you could explore! It is so important and very rewarding for you to get outside, take in some fresh air, see wildlife, discover culture, and learn your role in protecting our environment.

 

What if I have additional questions about the program?

General Questions about the Scout Ranger program can be directed to the NPS Regional Youth Coordinator that oversees programs in your state.

National Park Service Headquarters

George McDonald

202.513.7146

e-mail us

Alaska Region

Alaska

Randi Owens

907.644.3514

e-mail us

Intermountain

Arizona, Volorado, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming

Linda Lutz-Ryan

303.969.2638

e-mail us


Midwest Region

Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin

Phyllis Cremonini

402.661.1638

e-mail us

National Capital Region

District of Columbia

Cynthia Salter-Stith

202.619.7055

e-mail us

Northeast Region

Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia,

Robin Snyder

215.597.7385

e-mail us

Pacific West Region

American Samoa, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington

Sonya Capek

719.268.9877

e-mail us

Southeast Region

Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virgin Islands

Priscilla Nalls

404.507.5633

e-mail us