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Visitors hiking in a park.
How to earn a Scout Ranger Certificate or Patch
Scout Rangers

How to earn a Certificate or Patch

How to earn a certificate:

Scouts participate in organized educational programs or volunteer service projects for a minimum of five (5) hours at one or more national park sites.

Scouts are eligible to receive the Scout Ranger certificate upon completion of the program requirements. The certificate can be download here. Use of the certificate is on the honor system, as the certificate should only be downloaded after contributing five hours to a project.

Scouts can also share their experience by sending an email and photographs to e-mail us. Scouts are also encouraged to submit a short narrative to the BSA Good Turn for America website describing their participation and lessons learned.

How to earn a patch:

Scouts participate in organized educational programs or volunteer service projects for a minimum of ten (10) hours at one or more national park sites.

Scouts will be awarded a patch upon verbally reporting their completion of the program requirements to an NPS employee or volunteer at a visitor center or information center.

Scouts can also share their experience by sending an email to e-mail us. Scouts are also encouraged to submit a short narrative to the BSA Good Turn for America website describing their participation and lessons learned.

Scouts interested in keeping a log of their hours may use this tracking sheet. This is not a requirement, but keeping track may assist you in determining how many hours you have completed.

 

How to get started

Below are some guidelines on how to get involved in the Scout Ranger program.

Find a park:

Visit the Find a Park webpage to find a park in your state or any park of interest.

Learn about the park:

Visit and explore the parks website to learn a little about its history; the natural, cultural or historical resources it protects; and the activities the park offers such as hiking, biking, wildlife watching, canoeing, or snowshoeing.

Brainstorm activities to participate in:
Once you have learned a little bit about the park, think about activities that interest you. Many of the parks describe the interpretive and educational programs they offer to the public and various volunteer opportunities on their website. Record a list of ideas for possible activities.

Contact the park:

Contact the park to discuss the possible activities. Once on the park’s website, click on the Contact Us link in the left corner and call the park information number. Identify that you are interested in participating in the Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger program and would like to speak to the person who handles the program for the park.

Coordinate and plan with the park:

Work together with the park representative to determine the appropriate program or project. The park representative can also suggest ideas for activities. The park representative will work with you to ensure that the project is going to be fun, informative and help you gain a better understanding of the national parks and the many natural, cultural, and historical resources they protect!

Have Fun!

Once all the logistics are set up, go and have fun with the Scout Ranger program!

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