• Gettysburg National Military Park

    Gettysburg

    National Military Park Pennsylvania

Trees and Shrubs

Blooming Redbud tree at Gettysburg
Redbud blooming in springtime at Gettysburg.
(C. Davis, National Park Service)
 

Settlers cleared most of the original forest of the Gettysburg area for farming in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today wooded areas are in patches scattered across agricultural land. Penn State University surveyed six woodlots for species composition and community structure.Typical tree species of the forest include oaks, hickory, and poplar, which are common to the Appalachian area. The predominant overstory species of the wooded areas are white oak, white ash, and northern red oak. Common seedlings and saplings include spicebush, black cherry, and white ash. Also the state endangered shrub, the Missouri gooseberry, occurs through the northern section of the park.

Did You Know?

Irish Brigade Monument at Gettysburg

The bronze likeness of an Irish Wolfhound on the Irish Brigade monument at Gettysburg National Military Park symbolizes the loyalty shown for the Union cause by the brigade's soldiers, most of whom were Irish immigrants or sons of immigrants to the United States.