• Image of mountains and river

    Gates Of The Arctic

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Emergency Sheep Hunting Closure in Units 23 & 26(A)

    All sheep seasons in Game Management Units 23 and 26(A) for all resident and nonresident hunters are closed due to severe decline in sheep numbers in the contiguous populations of the De Long and Schwatka Mountains. More »

Connecting People to Ecosystems

The National Park Service recognizes that animal, human, and ecosystem health are inextricably linked and viewed holistically. A healthy ecosystem is a place where people, animals, plants, and natural processes interact in ways that support life within an historic range of variability. The living and nonliving components of the ecosystem are often connected in ways that are obscure, or are very complex and unexpected. Science (both western science and local knowledge) is essential in understanding these connections. By focusing research and monitoring on vital resources within an ecosystem, Park biologists and cooperating scientists can provide management with crucial information on current conditions and long-term trends of these vital resources. This will help ensure that the ecosystems are sustained for future generations.

Select 'Vital Resources' marked in red on the ecosystem graphic below for more information.
You can also select vital resources from the list at the bottom of the page.

 
Ecosystem Vital Resources Dalls SheepFireBirdsBrown BearsVegetationPeoplePermafrostCaribouLandscape Dynamics
 
 

Did You Know?

A snowy Mount Igikpak on a sunny day.

At 8510 feet, Mount Igikpak, at the headwaters of the Noatak River, is the highest peak in Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve.