• Sunken Road, Stone Wall and Innis House

    Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania

    National Military Park Virginia

Fredericksburg Battlefield

The Battle of Fredericksburg was fought on December 13, 1862. The information and links below will help you visit the battlefield and learn about the battle.

Location: The Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center is located at 1013 Lafayette Boulevard in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Directions to Visitor Center

Summary of Battle: To learn about the battle click here.

Articles on the Battle: Click here to read a series of articles about the Battle of Fredericksburg written by Donald Pfanz, the park's staff historian.

Walking Trails: Click here to access the trail literature.

Guided Walking Tours: Click here for tour times and locations.

Driving Tour: There are two sections of the battlefield; Prospect Hill and Marye's Heights. A five-mile driving tour links the two sections beginning at the Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center at the base of Marye's Heights.

Tape Tours: For those visitors wanting a more detailed tour, a tape tour can be rented or purchased in the bookstore. The tape tour takes approximately three hours to complete.

Virtual Tour. Take a virtual tour of the battlefield with photos and text by clicking here.

Fredericksburg Battlefield Photos: Click here.

Fredericksburg Battlefield Monument Photos: Click here.

Chatham Manor: Chatham Manor is a historic building that served as a headquarters and hospital during the battle. Indoor and outdoor exhibits can be viewed. Volunteers are available to lead tours and answer questions. Read more.

Civilian Aspects: An often overlooked aspect of the Civil War is its impact on the civilian populace of North and South. Fredericksburg, Virginia, for example, was occupied on three separate occasions by Union forces. These "invasions" of the town had a distinct psychological impact on the townspeople. Through the Civil War era writings of Fredericksburg residents it is possible for us to experience some of their anxiety and fear toward the Union army and also the elation of Confederate success. Read more.

Fredericksburg National Cemetery: Fredericksburg National Cemetery is the final resting place of over 15,000 United States Americans. Most of these are soldiers who died during the Civil War in the Fredericksburg area, but there are nearly one hundred 20th century veterans and a few spouses. Read more about the cemetery. If you are looking for a solider who is buried in the cemetery click here to down load the Microsoft Word document which you can then search.

Fredericksburg Confederate Cemetery: The Fredericksburg City Cemetery and Confederate Cemetery are situated at the corner of William Street and Washington Avenue, surrounded by a common brick wall. Six Confederate generals and more than 3,300 Southern soldiers lie buried there amid quiet, peaceful surroundings; 2,184 of them are unknown. Read more.

Pyramid. In the early 20th century a pyramid shaped monument was erected along the railroad on the Fredericksburg Battlefield to mark the area of General Meade's breakthrough. The purpose was to alert railroad passengers that they were passing through the Fredericksburg Battlefield. Click here for more information.

Go to Battle of Fredericksburg.

 
Pyramid Monument on the Fredericksburg Battlefield
Meade Pyramid on the Fredericksburg Battlefield

Did You Know?

Front Line Interp.

The park maintains a summer internship program. The program allows college students to work behind the information desk, as well as give tours of the battlefields and historic structures.