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Preparing to Excavate Little Proulx's House_070530

June 11, 2012 Posted by: Meagan Huff

Little Proulx's house

Today we are preparing for next week's field school. A backhoe is removing asphalt from two areas in the South Barracks, corresponding to two house sites in the Village.

This area was the site of a major intersection in the Village, where a road leading to the Village intersected with what is now East 5th Street. In 1846, to the west of this road were located the houses of three French Canadian servants of the Hudson's Bay Company: Charlebois, Little Proulx, and de Roche. The location where this photo was taken corresponds to Little Proulx's House.

There are very few records available to tell us who Little Proulx was, but church records indicate that his full name was probably Francois Proulx. On January 31, 1845, at the age of 31, Proulx married a Chinook woman named Catherine. Witnesses at their wedding were their neighbors in the Village, Charles and Nancy de Roche. Baptism and burial records tell us that the Proulxs had a daughter, Louise, at Fort Vancouver, who was born and died in 1852. There are no records of Little Proulx at Fort Vancouver after 1852.

According to historic maps, these houses were probably demolished around 1855, and the wood was salvaged by settlers and U.S. Army soldiers to use as firewood and building materials.

This summer, excavations in this historically residential area will reveal more information about what life was like in Fort Vancouver's employee Village.


5 Comments Comments Icon

  1. Cheryl - Oregon City, Oregon
    August 31, 2013 at 10:58

    Wonderful to find this! Paul Charlebois was my great great grandfather.

  2. Marcie - Vancouver, Washington
    June 22, 2012 at 11:03

    I wish we knew more about the PRoulx family. How sad that there daughter died. It is horrible that she only lived one year.. I wonder if they had more children. I hope they had a happy life. It makes me sad if they didn't.

  3. Tracy - Seaview, Washington
    June 22, 2012 at 10:26

    Thank you for giving "life" to Little Proulx's house....a young man likely full of dreams marries with his neighbors by his side. That story could be one of today and yet it represents the "marrying" of cultures, peoples in a new land. This young family was full of promise and the loss of their child was heartbreaking. We can learn so much from the people of this multi-cultural village. Keep up the important work that you do and please keep sharing. We as a people can learn so much!

  4. Allison - Vancouver, Washington
    June 20, 2012 at 10:07

    I can't wait to see what you find!

  5. Franklin - Seattle, Washington
    June 20, 2012 at 09:24

    This is very important information. I did not know the village had so many different kinds of people. I think I will need to visit this national park.

 

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