• View of Fort Union Trading Post NHS from Bodmer Overlook

    Fort Union Trading Post

    National Historic Site MT,ND

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  • Petroglyph National Monument

    How the Early Railroads Changed New Mexico

    How the Early Railroads Changed New Mexico

    This is a lesson that can be used to teach geography, history and economics using pictures, maps and scale models.

  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

    Assiniboine Children

    Assiniboine Children

    Although Assiniboine children and modern children are from in entirely different time periods, they share similar childhood experiences. They had chores, toys, grandparents, parents, and similar games. This lesson goes into aspects of Assiniboine culture with an emphasis on the toys that Assiniboine children received from their parents.

  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

    1800s River Transportation

    1800s River Transportation

    The Missouri River served as a highway that connected metropolises like St. Louis to fur trade forts like Fort Union Trading Post. Expeditions faced many hazards and took months to complete. This lesson identifies the different boats that made the dangerous and lengthy journey up the Missouri to Fort Union.

  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

    North American Indian Migration into North Dakota

    North American Indian Migration                                       into North Dakota

    This lesson puts the Assiniboine in a geographical context for further lessons about Assiniboine culture and the fur trade.

  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

    Fort Union Society

    Fort Union Society

    Diverse employees at Fort Union Trading Post contributed to 39 years of successful business. Tasks, clothing of employees, and salaries distinguished a person’s rank on the social hierarchy at Fort Union. This lesson provides a unique look into Fort Union's inhabitants and social hierarchy.

  • Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site

    Arts Crafts Clothing and Appearance Parfleche, Quillwork, Basketry

    Arts Crafts Clothing and Appearance Parfleche, Quillwork, Basketry

    Many arts and crafts of the Hidatsa served a utilitarian purpose such as parfleches, which were multipurpose cases made of rawhide, and burdon baskets that could carry large amounts of much needed items like vegetables. In this lesson, students will explore how burdon baskets and parfleches were made then construct, make and decorate a replica parfleche.

  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

    Fort Union Fur Trade Overview

    Fort Union Fur Trade Overview

    For 39 years, Fort Union was the longest-lasting and most profitable fur trading post on the Upper Missouri River. Here seven Northern Plains Indian Tribes, including the Assiniboine, traded buffalo robes and other furs for goods such as cloth, guns, blankets, and beads. A bastion of peaceful coexistence, this fort annually traded over 25,000 buffalo robes and $100,000 of merchandise. In this lesson, students will explore what the fur trade is, who it involved, and where it took place.

  • Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site

    Economy and Trade: Pre 1845

    Economy and Trade: Pre 1845

    In Economy and Trade: Pre 1845, students will learn about trade relations between tribes prior to European contact and how their experience prepared them for success in dealing with explorers and traders after European contact by re-enacting trading as it was practiced at Knife River Villages.

  • Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site

    The People: Pre-1845

    The People:  Pre-1845

    This lesson explores the history of the Three Affiliated Tribes from Pre-1845. Students will learn about Early Villages, Sacagawea, and other people of historic significance who visited the region and villages for exploration and trade. Students will create visual representations or graphic organizers that demonstrate connections among key concepts and ideas as concept maps. See the extensions for an example of a concept map.

Did You Know?

engage gathering

The French term engage´ (pronounced on-gah-zay)was applied to 70% of Fort Union's workforce. This group was mostly laborers, many who couldn't read, write or speak English and came from European countries.