• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • No Elevator Service at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

Your Safety

Fort Sumter National Monument is a special place. It is a monument to the people who fought and died at Fort Sumter and at Fort Moultrie. Many parts of the forts are fragile and so are you! Please keep yourself and the forts from being injured.

Climbing is unsafe and can damage something that cannot be replaced, including you. Stay on designated pathways.

Watch your step. Many historic surfaces are now uneven and some areas may be damp and slippery, especially in the rain. Use handrails when climbing stairs.

Some interior areas have no electric lights. They can be dark and dangerous.

As part of the National Park System, everything here is protected. Don’t remove or disturb any part of the fort structure or any living thing. If everyone who visited this place took just one brick, the fort would quickly disappear forever.

Smoking is not permitted within the fort, even the areas with no roof. Smoke only outside the fort entrance.

Some areas are closed with chains and other barriers. Crossing them puts you at risk of serious injury.

Use insect repellent in the warmer months. Beware of fire ant mounds.

Summer here is hot and humid, so drink plenty of water and take frequent breaks out of the sun.

Skates and skating are not permitted anywhere inside park boundaries. This includes Fort Sumter, the Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center at Liberty Square, the ferry to Fort Sumter, Liberty Square park, Fort Moultrie, and the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center. This restriction includes, but is not limited to, skateboards, roller skates, inline skates, and skate shoes such as Heelys.

Did You Know?

Fort Sumter as seen from the water.

Fort Sumter's island was constructed with a foundation of over 70,000 tons of granite and other rock. For over a decade contractors from as far away as New York and the Boston area delivered this material by ship and dumped it on a shoal in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC