• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • No Elevator Service at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

World War II Exhibit Premieres

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Date: May 28, 2004
Contact: Bill Martin, (843) 883-3123 x 41

A permanent new museum exhibit on World War II will premiere at the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center on Sullivan’s Island on Sunday, June 6, 2004. Officially opening on the 60th anniversary of D-Day in 1944, the exhibit features photos and artifacts from World War II as they relate to Fort Moultrie. The National Park Service is offering a 30-minute ranger guided program about Fort Moultrie during the World War II era on June 6 at 10:30, 2:00 and 3:30. These special programs will continue on Saturdays and Sundays at 11:00 a.m. through the summer.

Fort Moultrie was an active US Army fortification until after World War II. The fort’s history from the 1930s to 1947 included Colonel George C. Marshall’s command of the 8th US Infantry and the Coast Artillery, the addition of anti-aircraft guns throughout Fort Moultrie Military Reservation, the installation of a Harbor Entrance Control Post/Harbor Defense Command Post (jointly operated by the Army and Navy), a detachment of WACs (Women’s Army Corps), and the mining of Charleston Harbor’s entrance by German U-boats twice during the war.

Fort Moultrie is a unit of Fort Sumter National Monument, administered by the National Park Service. The history of Fort Moultrie encompasses all of American seacoast defense, from the Revolutionary War through World War II. The fort is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. except for Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. For additional information call (843) 883-3123

Did You Know?

Fort Sumter as seen from the water.

Fort Sumter's island was constructed with a foundation of over 70,000 tons of granite and other rock. For over a decade contractors from as far away as New York and the Boston area delivered this material by ship and dumped it on a shoal in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC