• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • No Elevator Service at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

New Law Permits Firearms

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: February 18, 2010
Contact: Bill Martin, (843) 883-3123 x 11
Contact: Bob Dodson, (843) 883-3123 x 14

A change in federal law effective February 22, allows people who can legally possess firearms under federal, South Carolina, and local law to possess those firearms at Fort Sumter National Monument, which includes Fort Moultrie, and Charles Pinckney National Historic Site.

The new federal law makes possession of firearms in national parks also subject to the firearms laws of the state and communities where the parks are located.

“We have been working closely with local, state, and federal officials to ensure that we clearly understand the provisions of the laws that will now apply to our visitors when they are in the park,” said Fort Sumter and Charles Pinckney Superintendent Bob Dodson. “We encourage every visitor who may wish to bring firearms to the park to do their research ahead of time and ensure that they are aware of and abide by the laws that apply.  Our goal is to provide safe, enjoyable park visits for everyone, and to preserve this very special place for people today and future generations.”

The new federal law has no effect on existing laws and regulations regarding the use of firearms in national parks for hunting. Hunting still is not allowed at Fort Sumter National Monument, Fort Moultrie or Charles Pinckney National Historic Site.  Federal law continues to prohibit firearms in certain facilities, such as park visitor centers; these facilities are posted with appropriate notices at public entrances.    

National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said, “We will administer this law as we do all others – fairly.  For nearly 100 years, the mission of the National Park Service has been to protect and preserve the parks and to help all visitors enjoy them. The parks belong to all Americans, and our commitment to the American people is to ensure the safety of our visitors and the special places that have been entrusted to our care.”

For more information about firearms laws that apply to Fort Sumter National Monument and Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, please visit http://www.sled.sc.gov/SCStateGunLaws1.aspx?MenuID=CWP. For more information about Fort Sumter National Monument and Fort Moultrie visit http://www.nps.gov/fosu and for Charles Pinckney National Historic site visit http://www.nps.gov/chpi

Did You Know?

Artist's rendition of the opening shot of the American Civil War with Fort Sumter in the distance.

The first shot of the American Civil War didn't hit anything. It was a 10-inch mortar shell, fired from Fort Johnson, that exploded above Fort Sumter as a signal for Confederate artillery to open fire on the Union-held fort. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC