• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

Military Wife-Military Life

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Date: July 31, 2012
Contact: Bill Martin, (843) 883-3123 x 11

Fort Sumter National Monument invites the public to Military Wife-Military Life: How Did We Get From This to This? This free program exploring the history of Fort Moultrie from a woman's perspective will be presented at the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center on Sullivan's Island on Saturday, August 11 at 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The program will identify and showcase fashion worn from the American Revolution through World War II.

Along with park staff, members of the Carolina Ladies Aid Society, Colonial Ladies Society, and the Ladies Living History Association of Charleston will model the clothing from eight historical periods. They include the Revolution (Georgian/Colonial), War of 1812 (Regency), Nullification Crisis (Romantic), War Between the States (Crinoline), Reconstruction (Bustle), Spanish American War (Bell Epoch), World War I (Edwardian) and World War II (Swing).

Fort Moultrie is administered by the National Park Service as a unit of Fort Sumter National Monument. Located at 1214 Middle Street, Sullivan's Island, South Carolina, the fort and visitor center are open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. except for New Year's, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Days. While the visitor center is free, an entrance fee of $3 per adult or $5 per family is charged to tour Fort Moultrie. For more information, call (843) 883-3123.

Did You Know?

32-pounder cannon, Model 1829, at Fort Moultrie

Fort Moultrie is the only unit of the National Park System where the entire 171-year history of American seacoast defense (1776-1947) can be traced. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC