• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • Accessibility Ramp at Fort Sumter Out of Service Friday, July 11

    The ramp will be out of service for maintenance starting the morning of Friday, July 11 for maintenance until at least 12:00 PM. Visitors with wheelchairs should plan on taking a later boat. For the latest information, call (843) 883-3123.

  • No Elevator Serivce at Fort Sumter

    Only the original parade ground level of Fort Sumter is accessible. Accommodations are made for disabled visitors traveling to Fort Sumter from Liberty Square. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

Kids Craft 2007

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Date: April 2, 2007
Contact: Bill Martin, (843) 883-3123 x 41

One day each month from April through July 2007 the Charleston area National Park Service sites will present free hands-on educational programs designed for kids. Known as “Kids Craft,” the programs are held from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. See the following schedule for program locations and dates. Kids can expect to participate hands-on in various crafts, games and other activities taken directly from history.

“We’re pleased to offer these new programs that are meant to be fun and educational activities for kids outside of the schoolroom,” said Superintendent Bob Dodson of Fort Sumter National Monument. “Our goal is to expose children to the diversity of history to be found here in the Low Country and understand that it’s not all about dry facts. While each Kids Craft program was designed with younger kids in mind, children of all ages are welcome to participate and they can bring their parents along, too.”

Saturday, April 21: Games Then and Now at the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center

10:00 - Hopscotch & Jump ropes

10:30 - Games of Strategy (Sea Battle, Jarabadash, & Pigs in a Pen)

11:00 - Games for all (I have a basket, Gossip, & Poor Doggie)

11:30 - Rebel Yell / Solider Relay Race

12:00 - Games of Strategy (Sea Battle, Jarabadash, & Pigs in a Pen)

12:30 - Games for all (I have a basket, Gossip, & Poor Doggie)

1:00 - Hopscotch & Jump ropes

1:30 - Rebel Yell / Solider Relay Race

 

Saturday, May 19: Morse Code at the Fort Moultrie Visitor Center

Thursday, June 14: Design Your Own Flag at the Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center

Saturday, July 21: Weather at Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

The Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center at Liberty Square is located at 340 Concord Street in Charleston. The facility is a launching point where visitors to Fort Sumter can learn all about the many events leading up to the division between North and South and why the resulting tension exploded into Civil War on April 12, 1861.

Fort Moultrie is located at 1214 Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island. First constructed in 1776 of palmetto logs and sand, Fort Moultrie was not deactivated until 1947. This is the only site in the National Park System where visitors can trace the entire 171-year history of American seacoast defense. Fort Moultrie and its visitor center are open daily from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. While the programs and visitor center are free, there is an entrance fee to tour the fort: Adults $3, Seniors $1, children free.

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site is located at 1254 Long Point Road in Mount Pleasant. The park is a 28-acre remnant of Charles Pinckney’s Lowcountry plantation Snee Farm. Charles Pinckney was a signer and principal author of the United States Constitution. Museum exhibits, a 20-minute video and a ½-mile walking trail tell the story of the birth of the Constitution, the United States as a young nation and the influence of African American culture on Charles Pinckney.

For additional information call park headquarters at (843) 883-3123.

Did You Know?

Fort Sumter as seen from the water.

Fort Sumter's island was constructed with a foundation of over 70,000 tons of granite and other rock. For over a decade contractors from as far away as New York and the Boston area delivered this material by ship and dumped it on a shoal in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC