• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • No Elevator Serivce at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

Fort Moultrie Dock Dredging

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Date: November 5, 2012
Contact: Bill Martin, (843) 883-3123 x 11

Fort Sumter National Monument will start work on Monday, November 5 on maintenance dredging operations at the Fort Moultrie dock and approach leading to the Intracoastal Waterway. Approximately 17,000 cubic yards is expected to be dredged. The work should take approximately three to four weeks to complete.

Maintenance dredging of this area is needed approximately every five to seven years to maintain a safe depth for the boats that provide transportation for staff and equipment to and from Fort Sumter. The Charleston District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will provide construction management services for this project.

Located on Sullivan's Island, there have been three forts on this site since 1776. The first Fort Moultrie, built of palmetto logs and sand, is the location of the first major Patriot victory of the American Revolution on June 28, 1776. Abandoned after the war, this fort was replaced by a second Fort Moultrie in 1798, which was then destroyed by an 1804 hurricane. The current Fort Moultrie was completed in 1809 and was not closed by the US Army until 1947. Fort Moultrie is a unit of Fort Sumter National Monument and is located at 1214 Middle Street, Sullivan's Island, South Carolina. The fort and visitor center are open daily from 9:00-5:00 except for New Year's, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day. For more information, call (843)883-3123.

Did You Know?

Fort Sumter as seen from the water.

Fort Sumter's island was constructed with a foundation of over 70,000 tons of granite and other rock. For over a decade contractors from as far away as New York and the Boston area delivered this material by ship and dumped it on a shoal in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC