• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • No Elevator Serivce at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

2008 Fort Sumter Anniversary Events

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Date: April 7, 2008
Contact: Rick Hatcher, (843) 883-3123 x 22

On the weekend of April 12-13, 2008, the National Park Service will commemorate the 147th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War at Fort Sumter. On both days visitors will have the opportunity to enjoy two different special programs in recognition of the 1861 bombardment.

On Saturday and Sunday members of the 10th South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment will demonstrate musket firing after each ferry arrives. Visitors are invited to talk with the reenactors about their uniforms, weapons, and equipment. Additionally members of the Coastal Amateur Radio Club will establish two amateur “ham” radio stations within Fort Sumter and will be communicating with fellow “ham” radio operators around the world. Visitors are welcome to talk with the radio operators to learn about the important service this organization provides during hurricanes and other widespread emergencies.

Both programs are free. Visitors taking the ferry to Fort Sumter will pay regular ticket prices.

Fort Sumter National Monument is administered by the National Park Service. From March 15 – August 20 the fort is open daily for private boaters from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. A concession-operated ferry departs daily from the Fort Sumter Visitor Center at Liberty Square in downtown Charleston at 9:30, 12:00 and 2:30. A second ferry departs from Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant at 10:45, 1:30 and 4:00.

For more information, please call (843) 883-3123.

Did You Know?

Fort Sumter as seen from the water.

Fort Sumter's island was constructed with a foundation of over 70,000 tons of granite and other rock. For over a decade contractors from as far away as New York and the Boston area delivered this material by ship and dumped it on a shoal in Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC