• Currier & Ives lithograph depicting the bombardment of Fort Sumter

    Fort Sumter

    National Monument South Carolina

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  • No Elevator Serivce at Fort Sumter

    The museum, restrooms, bookstore, and top level of Fort Sumter are only accessible by climbing stairs. For more information, visit the link below or please call (843) 883-3123. More »

  • No Water or Restrooms at Fort Sumter

    Due to a break in the Charleston water line supplying Fort Sumter, restrooms and drinking water are not available at the fort. Please bring drinking water with you if you plan to visit. Water and restrooms are available aboard the ferries.

Fort Moultrie Visitor Center Museum Exhibits

Fort Moultrie was well situated to guard Charleston Harbor. Because of shoals at the harbor entrance, ships were forced to enter the harbor from the south and sail toward the fort on Sullivan's Island. In this position, they could not fire on the fort until they turned into the harbor. By the mid-19th century, Fort Sumter added its firepower to keep ships out of the harbor. Since Moultrie was in continuous use by the Army for coastal defense for 171 years, it has played an important role in the nation’s history. Please use the links to the museum exhibits to learn more about Fort Moultrie during these important events.

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Did You Know?

The 33-star United States flag flown atop Fort Sumter during the opening bombardment of the Civil War in 1861, on exhibit at Fort Sumter

The first human death of the Civil War occurred on April 14, 1861, the day after the battle of Fort Sumter ended. Private Daniel Hough died when the cannon he was loading (for the Union's 100-gun salute to the U.S. flag) discharged prematurely. Fort Sumter National Monument, SC