• large wooden spikes jut out from a large wooden angular wall lit by sunlight. verdant grass surrounds it.

    Fort Stanwix

    National Monument New York

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  • Bridge Repair Work

    Beginning September 15, the main bridge into the fort will be closed for repairs. Visitors will be able to access the fort through the sally port entrance. An accessible ramp will be available upon request. Visit the Willett Center for assistance on-site.

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Park Description
Fort Stanwix National Monument is a reconstructed Revolutionary War-era fort, with related outworks. It is federally owned and managed by the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. The reconstructed fort was built on the footprint of the original Fort Stanwix. The site was established as a national monument in 1935, but fort reconstruction did not commence until 1974 when an archeological study by NPS was completed. The reconstructed fort was opened to the public in 1976, exhibiting a portion of the extensive archeological collections found on-site. The National Monument site occupies approximately 16 acres and is bordered by main thoroughfares surrounded by a mixture of commercial, residential, light industrial, and institutional land uses, none of which were present during the fort's period of occupation. The site of the fort, but not the reconstructed structure, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is a National Historic Landmark, significant for the events that transpired there during the American Revolution.

The reconstructed fort consists of an earth and timber-clad, reinforced concrete structure that surrounds three freestanding buildings. Located within the reconstructed fort, there is an original feature -- the foundation of a brick hearth. A detailed description of the fort features can be found in the Affected Environment section (Part Three) of this document. Several structures which were proposed in the 1967 master plan have not been reconstructed, including the Ravelin, Sally Port, Headquarters, and Guardhouse.

There are a number of sites located within a day's drive of the fort that are related to the siege of Fort Stanwix. They include Saratoga National Historical Park in Stillwater, NY, and Oriskany Battlefield State Historic Site in nearby Whitestown.

The reconstructed fort is closed to the public during the winter months, but the Marinus Willett Collections Management and Education Center (2005) is open year-round, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., except for January 1, Thanksgiving Day (U.S.), and December 25. Admission to the Marinus Willett Center and Fort are free. Visitors are encouraged to start their experience at the Marinus Willett Center at the intersection of West Dominick and James Streets. A park ranger can assist you in planning your visit. For more information about upcoming events call the park at 315-338-7730. Please visit the park's web page at www.nps.gov/fost for additional information.

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Park Purpose and Significance
The purpose of Fort Stanwix National Monument is to preserve the location, resources, and stories associated with the military, political, and cultural events that occurred at the site of Fort Stanwix and to provide opportunities for visitor understanding and appreciation of these events.

Fort Stanwix National Monument is significant because it commemorates the broader contest of nations for economic and political control of the rich resources within the Mohawk Valley region of New York State and the Northern Frontier during the 18th and early 19th centuries.

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Enabling Park Legislation
After the 150th anniversary of the siege was celebrated in 1927, interest in the fort and the historic events in which it had figured was renewed. The State of New York purchased a small lot and erected a commemorative monument on the site in 1927. As a result of state and local interest, Fort Stanwix National Monument was authorized by Public Law No. 74-291 [s.739] August 21, 1935 [see 16 U.S.C. 450 l-n] in order to preserve "a national monument for the benefit and inspiration of the people." Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes recommended that the bill be passed, noting that the area is "the site of a battle of great importance in American history and is worthy of federal protection..."

Fort Stanwix Act, Public Law No. 29
174th Congress
AN ACT
To provide for the establishment of a national monument on the site of Fort Stanwix in the State of New York
Sec. 1.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That when title to the site or portion thereof at Fort Stanwix, in the State of New York, together with such buildings and other property located thereon as may be designated by the Secretary of the Interior as necessary or desirable for national monument purposes, shall have been vested in the United States, said area and improvements, if any, shall be designated and set apart by proclamation of the President for preservation as a national monument for the benefit and inspiration of the people and shall be called the "Fort Stanwix National Monument:" Provided, That such area shall include at least that part of Fort Stanwix now belonging to the State of New York.

Sec. 2. That the Secretary of the Interior be, and he is hereby, authorized to accept donations of land, interests in land and/or buildings, structures, and other property within the boundaries of said national monument as determined and fixed hereunder, and donations of funds for the purchase and/or maintenance thereof, the title and evidence of title to lands acquired to be satisfactory to the Secretary of the Interior: Provided, That he may acquire on behalf of the United States out of any donated funds, by purchase at prices deemed by him reasonable, or by condemnation under the provisions of the Act of August 1, 1888, such tracts of land within the said national monument as may be necessary for the completion thereof.

Sec. 3. That the administration, protection, and development of the aforesaid national monument shall be exercised under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior by the National Park Service, subject to the provisions of the Act of August 25, 1916, entitled "An Act to establish a National Park Service, and for other purposes", as amended. [August 21, 1935]

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Museum Collections
Collection Summary
Military arms and accoutrements; clothing, hardware, utensils, Indian artifacts, furniture and furnishings from the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War periods; 18th century manuscript collection; archeological objects and associated field records relating to the 18th century fort occupation (c. 1758-1781) and to the City of Rome, N.Y. (c. 1796-1970).

Collection Size
476,211

Facilities Exhibiting Museum Items
Marinus Willett Collections and Education Center

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Yearly Park Statistics

Visitation
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2010 - 104,146
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2009 - 92,363
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2008 - 72,093
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2007 - 57,928
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2006 - 62,868
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2005 - 65,001
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2004 - 68,427
Total Recreation Visits for FY 2003 - 58,366
Budget
FY 2011 Annual Budget was $1,584,000.00
FY 2010 Annual Budget was $1,625,000.00
FY 2009 Annual Budget was $1,529,000.00
FY 2008 Annual Budget was $1,342,910.00
FY 2007 Annual Budget was $1,305,700.00
FY 2006 Annual Budget was $1,316,000.00
FY 2005 Annual Budget was $1,307,000.00
FY 2004 Annual Budget was $1,275,000.00
FY 2003 Annual Budget was $1,289,000.00
Acreage
Gross Area Acres for FY 2011 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2010 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2009 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2008 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2007 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2006 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2005 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2004 - 16
Gross Area Acres for FY 2003 - 16

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Did You Know?

A large black triangular hat is right in your face. A man wearing it holds a flute like intrument, he wears a red coat with white facings.

Musicians in the Continental Army of the American Revolutionary War acted as the radios of their day. They wore the opposite colors of the other troops in their regiment so their officers could see them to relay orders and form lines around them quickly in battle.