• large wooden spikes jut out from a large wooden angular wall lit by sunlight. verdant grass surrounds it.

    Fort Stanwix

    National Monument New York

Come Celebrate the Holidays in a Different Light

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Date: November 30, 2013
Contact: Valerie Morgan, 315-338-7730

It is a long holiday weekend. How will you entertain your guests? Why not bring your family, friends, and holiday visitors to Fort Stanwix National Monument and see the fort by candlelight? On Saturday, November 30th, from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, the staff and volunteers of Fort Stanwix NM invite you to the park’s annual Holiday Open House to explore winter through the eyes of an 18thCentury Mohawk Valley resident.

Candlelit rooms, bedecked for the holidays, will be staffed by reenactors portraying life from holidays past. Musicians will perform period music and you will be invited to sing along to the merry sounds of yesteryear. You’ll discover the origins of some of today’s favorite American holiday traditions and forgotten favorites of the past. For the younger set, there will be a take-home craft activity and holiday exploration booklet. The Marinus Willett Center, at the corner of James and Dominick Streets, will be open to the public throughout the evening. Stop in to build your own fort, explore artifacts, and browse the bookstore.

Fort Stanwix National Monument is open seven days a week from9 am to 5 pm. Admission to the park is free. Activities are ongoing unless noted. For more information about upcoming events, please call the park at (315) 338-7730. Visit the park's web page at www.nps.gov/fost for additional information about the park and up-to-date news about park events.         
                                                                              
                                                          - NPS -

Did You Know?

tents with white walls surround grass and wooden walls twice as tall

Fort Stanwix has two names. Named for Gen. John Stanwix, this was the fort's name under the British. When rebuilt by the Americans, it was then named for Gen. Phillip Schuyler. However, there were several other Fort Schuylers in New York at that time, so the name never stuck due to the confusion.