• Dogwoods in bloom during the spring

    Fort Raleigh

    National Historic Site North Carolina

Fort Raleigh NHS Auditorium Reopens

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Date: August 15, 2006
Contact: Outer Banks Group, (252) 473-2111

The National Park Service invites the public to the reopening of the Lindsay Warren Visitor Center auditorium at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site on August 18, 2006. Constructed in 1965, the auditorium is mainly used to show the film Roanoke: The Lost Colony. Although changes have occurred over the years to the seating and stage, the auditorium as a whole needed updating and enhancement, including the implementation of improvements aimed at meeting contemporary accessibility requirements.

Beginning in the spring, park staff began to renovate the room including the installation of new carpeting, floor tiles, entrance doors, and a projection screen, as well as rehanging the stage curtains, painting, and other minor repairs. The large stage installed in the 1990s for the production of "Elizabeth R" was removed. Underneath, the smaller, original 1965 stage was discovered still intact and in good condition. It was refurbished with new carpet and by refinishing the wood trim. The seating area was completely redone to provide greater comfort as well as accessibility. The original seats were replaced with new ergonomically shaped seating and a small level platform was installed to provide a safe and accessible seating area for wheelchairs and nearby companion seating. Overall, this exciting renovation returns the auditorium to its original splendor and significantly improves the facility’s accessibility and technology.

On August 18th, performers from The Lost Colony with period instruments and costumes will present the special program entitled Elizabethan Music in the Lindsay Warren Visitors Center at 1:00 pm to celebrate Virginia Dare’s 419th birthday.

Did You Know?

The First Colony Foundation retrieving data in the Visitor Center.

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site possesses areas where 16th century European artifacts have been discovered. The non-profit group First Colony Foundation is planning to perform archaeology in the area for the next several years. More...