• Fort Necessity (NPS photo by Debbie Martinez)

    Fort Necessity

    National Battlefield Pennsylvania

Input Sought on Proposed Visitor Services Plan at Open House

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Date: March 5, 2008
Contact: MaryEllen Snyder, 724-329-8131

Farmington PA – The National Park Service will hold an open house at the Fort Necessity/National Road Interpretive and Education Center in Farmington, PA from 10:00 a.m. to 12 p.m., on March 15, 2008 to make sure that that the public has significant input on the Long Range Interpretive Plan for Fort Necessity National Battlefield.

      The Long Range Interpretive Plan will define the goals for a wide variety of visitor services and educational programs, while protecting and preserving the park resources.  The plan will provide park management and staff with direction for all interpretive operations.  It will be used as a reference for identifying staffing requirements for the park, as well as to identify partners and stakeholders with whom the National Park Service may work with in developing and presenting programs..

       “The National Park Service operates Fort Necessity National Battlefield for the American people,” said MaryEllen Snyder, Chief of Visitor Services at the park.  “We encourage the public to provide suggestions on the types of interpretive programs they would like to have offered at the park.” 

      Those interested in providing comments can visit the National Park Service planning Web site at http://parkplanning.nps.gov.  Comments on the types of visitor and interpretive services may also be submitted, in writing, to the Site Manager at Fort Necessity National Battlefield, 1 Washington Parkway, Farmington, PA  15437.  Comments may also be sent by e-mail to MaryEllen Snyder.  Comments must be received by March 16, 2008. 

Did You Know?

George Washington

Before the battle at Fort Necessity, George Washington wrote that the meadow would be “a charming field for an encounter”. After the skirmish at Jumonville Glen he wrote there was “something charming in sound” of bullets. After his defeat at Fort Necessity he never again refers to war as charming. More...