• Fort Necessity (NPS photo by Debbie Martinez)

    Fort Necessity

    National Battlefield Pennsylvania

French Marines Encamp at Fort Necessity

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Date: July 16, 2007
Contact: Brian Reedy, 724-329-5811
Contact: MaryEllen Snyder, 724-329-8131

FARMINGTON, Pa., - An historic detachment of French Marines will set up camp in the Great Meadows near Fort Necessity National Battlefield on this weekend, July 21 and 22. The camp will be open to visitors from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

In the spring of 1754, soldiers from the French Marines, New France Militia, and their Indian allies surrounded George Washington's Fort Necessity and forced him to surrender and retreat back to Virginia. The French returned to Fort Duquesne, which was under the command of Captain Contrecoeur.

The encampment features Compagnie Franches de la Marines du Contrecoeur -- an educational living history unit from Fort Duquesne. The group prides itself on accurate, complete, historical re-enactment of the dress, customs, manners, and activities of the period. All able-bodied men will have a serviceable musket, as required by the Governor General of the time. Visitors are encouraged to explore the camp and re-enactors welcome inquiries into the happenings of those early years.

Special programs on Military History will be presented at 12:00pm, 2:00pm, and 4:00pm both days. The programs will conclude with a demonstration and firing of historic weapons like those used during the French and Indian War.

Fort Necessity National Battlefield is located 11 miles east of Uniontown, Pennsylvania on US 40 – The Historic National Road. Admission to the park is $5.00 per adult, children 15 and under are free of charge. The fee is collected at the Interpretive and Education Center and is valid for seven days. For more information on this and other programs at Fort Necessity, please call (724) 329-5811 or visit the web site www.nps.gov/fone and www.marinesducontrecoeur.org.

Did You Know?

Indians and British Soldiers

The Delaware warrior Shingas initially wanted to fight with the British. He asked British Gen. Braddock if the Indians could live on the land after the French were defeated. Braddock said no Indians will own the land. Shingas got so angry he went to fight with the French.