Lesson Plan

How Children Learned in the Past – Background Information

Photograph of the one-room Potter School
One-room Potter School
National Park Service

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Subject:
American Indian History and Culture, Education, Family Life, French and Indian War
Duration:
30-45 minutes
Group Size:
Up to 24
Setting:
classroom
National/State Standards:
National Standards for History: K-4: Standard 1, 2, 3. Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: I, II, V. Common Core State Standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.K.1.

Overview

This packet contains information that teachers and parents can use to familiarize students with their upcoming field trip or reinforce their learning after their visit to Fort Necessity. 

Objective(s)

Guiding Question: How did American Indian children who lived in the 1750s learn? Who were the Iroquois "Three Sisters"? What was wampum? What was Fort Necessity? What was the Potter School? What was the Mount Washington Tavern?

 

Critical Content: Parents or teachers can introduce children to the way American Indian children learned, who the Iroquois "Three Sisters" are, what wampum is, what happened at Fort Necessity and the connection between the Potter School and the Mount Washington Tavern.

 

Student objectives: Students will…

·        Identify the Three Sisters

·        Explain what wampum is

 



Background

This packet contains information that teachers and parents can use to familiarize students with their upcoming field trip or reinforce their learning after their visit to Fort Necessity. It has sections entitled: American Indian Children in the 1750s; Iroquois Story of the Three Sisters; Wampum; Fort Necessity; James Sampey, the Potter School and the Mount Washington Tavern; and Mount Washington Tavern.

 



Procedure

1.    Download the pdf for teachers or parents

2.    Make copies

3.    Teach and discuss with the students

 



Park Connections

The material in this packet relates to the history of Fort Necessity and the American Indian families that lived in the area in the 1750s. The packet also explains how the owner of the Mount Washington Tavern, James Sampey, was on the school board that voted to build a one-room school house. The packet gives information on the still standing one-room school house, Potter School, and the Mount Washington Tavern.

 



Vocabulary

American Indian, One-room school, Wampum