• The Garrison Flag flies over Fort McHenry.

    Fort McHenry

    National Monument and Historic Shrine Maryland

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  • Reg. Hours Hours: September 3, 2013 - May 24, 2014

    Park: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Star Fort: 9 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. Visitor Center: 9 a.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Event Details

  • Multiple Days: 08/03/2013, 08/04/2013

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    Location: Star Fort Time: 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Fee Information: Regular Fees Apply Contact Name: Vince Vaise Contact Email: e-mail us Contact Phone Number: 410-962-4290

Following the Battle of Gettysburg, thousands of wounded, Confederate prisoners, and Union soldiers descended on Baltimore. This event marks the 150th anniversary when the war came home.
Visitors will gain a greater insight into how the war affected the home front through living history demonstrations featuring a Civil War surgeon examining patients, Confederate "prisoners" being marched into the fort, Union soldiers garrisoning the fort, stirring Fort McHenry Guard FIfe and Drum Corps, cannon-firing demonstrations and special activities for children and young adults.  For the entire weekend Fort McHenry will be surrounded by white tents and reinforcements.
The highlight of the weekend will be the FREE twilight tattoo on August 3 at 6:00 p.m!
The twilight tattoo on August 3 will recreate the military ceremonies held at Fort McHenry 150 years ago.  Once again the walls of the fort will resound with the thunder of the fifes and drums playing pieces such as "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," "Dixie," and "The Battle Cry of Freedom."  Following the concert 100 Union reenactors portraying the garrison will drill and hold their final muster before "Lights Out."  Visitors will be invited to watch the evening gun being fired and join the parade as the garrison marches out of the fort at the end of the ceremony.
• Special programs:
• Saturday, August 3,  author Daniel Toomey will give a talk on "U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War." This is the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The first recruitment of African American soldiers began in 1863.
• Sunday, 2:00 p.m. "Remember Armistead" - George Armistead was the commander of Fort McHenry during the 1814 bombardment. His nephew, Lewis Armistead, was mortally wounded at Gettysburg fighting for the Confederacy. A memorial ceremony held at Old Saint Pauls Cemetery in Baltimore, will honor both of them.