• The legendary battle between Confederate guns and US ironclads at Fort Donelson, February 14, 1862.

    Fort Donelson

    National Battlefield Tennessee

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  • The Eagle has Flown!

    The juvenile eagle at Fort Donelson has fledged. The eagles now reside at the Confederate River Batteries, stop #4 on the driving tour. Visitors are encouraged to view and admire, but asked to keep a respectful distance, as this is their home.

Multimedia Presentations

 
Gott

Kendall Gott at Jackson's Battery

NPS

On February 11, 2012, Professor Kendall Gott, author of Where the South Lost the War: An Analysis of the Fort Henry, Fort Donelson Campaign visited the park and shared his thoughts on the significance of this campaign. You can watch the video of this presentation here, courtesy of our friends at C-Span.

 
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cellphone

Learn some compelling stories with your cell phone!

You can now experience the park with your cell phone!

It's free, and only costs your minutes.

Simply dial (585)421-7348, and enter the number of the stop:

1. (At the Visitor Center) An introduction to the Forts Heiman, Henry and Donelson campaign.

2. (At the Confederate Monument, tour route stop #1) Learn more about this special monument.

3. (At the River Batteries, tour route #4) Learn more about the River Batteries and the incredible struggle here.

4. (At either tour route stops #8 or 9) Learn more about the struggle between Union and Confederate forces as the Confederates attempted to create an escape route to the east.

5. (At tour route stop #10) Learn more about the Dover Hotel, the only surviving original surrender structure remaining from the American Civil War...the site of Simon Buckner's surrender to Ulysses Grant.

6. (At tour route stop #11) Learn more about the National Cemetery and how this land was used in the months and years after the February, 1862, battle.

7. (At any time) Learn the legacy of the Battles at Forts Henry, Heiman, and Donelson, and how these battles helped determine the final outcome of the war. Learn too, about some of those who participated in this battle.

You can also use the mobile web tour, here.

We thank you for using this service. We hope to add stops in the near future. This tour is made possible this year by Eastern National, a nonprofit partner of the NPS which operates the bookstore in our visitor center.

 
Grant writing his Memoirs

Ulysses Grant writing his memoirs.

NPS

Near the end of his life, in search for financial security for his family, former President Ulysses S. Grant wrote his memoirs. Often considered a classic, and among the best of American writings, you can read Grant's Memoirs here.

 
Dr. John H. Brinton

Dr. John H. Brinton

Major John H. Brinton was an essential part of the Fort Henry and Fort Donelson campaign. Dr. Brinton was responsible for the establishment of field hospitals and the care of the wounded during the Battle of Fort Donelson. His memoir provides a most unique insight into the thoughts of his superior,Ulysses S. Grant.The Personal Memoirs of John H. Brinton, Civil War Surgeon, 1861-1865, can be read here.

 
Jackson's Battery, winter 2011

Jackson's Battery, Winter, 2011.

NPS

No study of the American Civil War is complete without visiting the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Often, and affectionately, known as the "ORs," these records included official reports, orders, maps, and so forth. The process of compiling the ORs began before the end of the War. It took many years, however, for them to be printed, finally being published between 1881 and 1901. The Fort Henry and Fort Donelson campaign of 1862 can be found in Series I, Volume 7...a digital copy of which can be found here.

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?

Grant at Fort Donelson

BG Charles F. Smith, a division commander under BG US Grant during the Battle of Fort Donelson, was Commandant of Cadets during Grants and Buckner’s time at West Point.