• The legendary battle between Confederate guns and US ironclads at Fort Donelson, February 14, 1862.

    Fort Donelson

    National Battlefield Tennessee

Special Park Ranger Program at Fort Heiman July 6 and 7

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: June 29, 2012
Contact: Susan Hawkins, (931)232-5706, ext. 104

Did you ever think you could become a Junior Ranger?  It's not just for kids. Mark your calendars for the Not-So-Junior Ranger program at Fort Heiman, KY on July 6 and 7, 2012.  This opportunity offers visitors a chance to walk the historic fort at Fort Heiman with a park ranger and learn a little about the history of the historic fort and the natural resources of the site. Grandparents and families are encouraged to come explore the site. The program should last about 30 minutes and includes a short walking tour of the fortification.

A National Park Service Ranger will meet visitors at Fort Heiman on Friday, July 6, and Saturday, July 7, for programs beginning at 11 a.m. Program materials will be provided, but be sure to bring your own water and insect repellant.  Parking is limited. There are no fees. For additional information, contact the Park Ranger staff at 931-232-5706 x 104.  Please check the park's website: www.nps.gov/fodo for weather updates, cancellations, or directions to the Fort Heiman site in Calloway County, Kentucky. For specific directions to the Fort Heiman location, please call (931)232-5706, ext. 104.

 Many National Parks offer visitors the opportunity to join the National Park Service Family as Junior Rangers. Interested students complete a series of activities during their park visit, share their answers with a park ranger, and receive an official Junior Ranger badge or patch and Junior Ranger certificate. The Not-So-Junior Ranger program is offered by Fort Donelson National Battlefield for groups, scouts, and families.

 

Did You Know?

freedmensbureau2

There was a significant enslaved population in Stewart County, TN, before and during the 1862 battle. After the Union victories at Forts Heiman, Henry and Donelson, many freedom seeking slaves sought refuge at these forts, even establishing a community near today's Fort Donelson National Cemetery.