• The legendary battle between Confederate guns and US ironclads at Fort Donelson, February 14, 1862.

    Fort Donelson

    National Battlefield Tennessee

Boundary Adjustment Study

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Study Cover

PROVIDED FOR INFORMATION ONLY is a copy of the 2003 U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service (NPS) conducted Boundary Adjustment Study and Environmental Assessment (BAS & EA) on whether to recommend that Congress authorize expanding the boundaries of Fort Donelson National Battlefield (FODO), in Stewart County, Tennessee, in order to protect related historic sites. The BAS & EA also analyses the environmental impacts of such an action. The sites include: 1) ten eligible properties within the battlefield core area of Fort Donelson itself; 2) Fort Henry, also in Stewart County, Tennessee, and 3) Fort Heiman, located in neighboring Calloway County, Kentucky.

Executive Summary
Table of Contents
Introduction to Study and Assessment
Figure 1-21. Properties eligible for addition
Alternatives Including the No Action
Affected Environment
Environmental Consequences
Consultation and Coordination
Compliance With Federal and State Regulation
References Cited
List of Preparers

Appendices A - C
Appendices D - F

Did You Know?

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On February 16, 1862, Confederate General Simon B. Buckner surrendered Fort Donelson to Ulysses Grant. Several years later, Buckner would serve as the Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In 1885, he would serve as a pallbearer to his old friend Ulysses Grant.