• Massive petrified redwood stumps

    Florissant Fossil Beds

    National Monument Colorado

Introduction (Unit 1) - Pleistocene Florissant

Timeline of Florissant Fossil Beds
 
Figure 1 - The maximum extent of glacial ice in the north polar area during the Pleistocene. Image courtesy of the USGS.

Figure 1 - The maximum extent of glacial ice in the north polar area during the Pleistocene.

Image courtesy of the USGS.

A large part of the North American continent was covered by multiple generations of ice sheets, glaciers formed on some mountains in Colorado. Mastadons, Mammoths, ancestors to the modern horse, large deer, camels, giant ground sloths and bear-sized beavers grazed the grasslands of North America. A fossil jaw and molar of a Columbian mammoth was found at Florissant in 1994. Hunting these giant herbivores were short-faced bears, saber-toothed cats, cheetahs, maned lions, and dire wolves (large ancestors to today's wolves). North America during the Pleistocene also witnessed the migration of humans approximately 15,000 years ago.

About the same time as the migration of humans to North America the climate began to change, the ice sheets began to retreat, and the large mammals began to go extinct. A number of hypothesis have been developed which includes: extinction brought about by the drastic climate change, being hunted to extinction by humans, and by viruses introduced by migrating animals that followed humans such as dogs rats, and birds.

 
Phanerozoic Climate Change
More info: http://www.globalwarmingart.com/wiki/Image:Phanerozoic_Climate_Change_Rev.png
 

Did You Know?

FLFO_Weevil

Weevils are a type of beetle, and they are among the smallest complete fossils found in the Florissant fossil beds. The fossil pictured here is less than 3 millimeters long, which is a little larger than the head of a pin but smaller than a pencil eraser. This image is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. To learn More...